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» A Well Regulated Militia » Weaponry » Ammunition » Steel cased ammo and the elements

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Author Topic: Steel cased ammo and the elements
medic 812
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How did the Russian and Comm-block armies deal with the rusting of their steel cased ammunition while in the field exposed to the elements? Even laquered cases begin to rust when wet for very long. How do I keep from having mags full of rusty rounds if I have to field with an AK/SKS/Nagant/PSL and all I have is steel cased ammo?
Posts: 2 | From: East | Registered: Mar 2010  | Report this post to a Moderator
Flight-ER-Doc
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The spam cans they came in protected the lacquered cases.

The way to prevent having rusty rounds is to keep the ammo in an ammo can until combat is imminent.

--------------------
Emergency Medicine - saving the world from themselves, one at a time.

"Thou shalt not be a victim, thou shalt not be a perpetrator, but, above all, thou shalt not be a bystander."

I make the ADL soil themselves. And that makes me very happy :)

Posts: 1949 | From: Slipping the surly bonds of earth | Registered: Dec 2004  | Report this post to a Moderator
patriotnwi
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Keep some steel wool and oil in your cleaning kit... Just found a case of wolf 556 that got caught in a flood, rusty, real rusty, but alittle steel wool action and a wipe down with oil cloth and they run just fine... Even through my AR...
Posts: 732 | From: Republic of Indiana | Registered: Oct 2001  | Report this post to a Moderator
Sisu
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It is a hypothetical question... All metal corrodes and if you take care of the rifle and ammo you can slow it down. Shoot the shit and practice and keep buying more. It is as far as I am concerned a non issue... Keep a bunch of the shit ready and practice marksmanship often. I would rather have steel, brass, corrosive, non corrosive, armor piercing, etc. etc. ammo on hand than nothing because I cant afford it? Who gives a rats ass... I'd rather have 2000 rounds of corrosive shit in spam cans than debate on the shit.

Arguing on the internet is like running in the Special Olympics... Even if you win you are still retarded...

Who cares what we say just because we have and have tried the shit you are talking about...

50 year old commie shit that goes boom is just fine. Ammo my rifle likes to eat may not work well in yours.
practice practice practice!
S

Posts: 718 | From: Central Wisconsin | Registered: Feb 2010  | Report this post to a Moderator
Breacher
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Second the notion on steel wool and oil. The guns that stuff is used in don't seem to suffer much if you oil the ammo. In theory, oiled ammo puts more wear on bolt locking lugs because the case does not "grab" the chamber walls as hard at the moment of firing. Reality, I have never seen a kaboom in all my years of dealing with firearms that was really traceable to use of lubed ammo. If you are using a rifle which develops cracks in the locking lugs for any reason, it's time to junk it and get something new.

Unwritten rule of keeping up volume of fire with full autos: lube the damn ammo, especially belted ammo. If my M60 was not dripping CLP, the A-gunner was not putting enough on the belt. This was especialy true with blanks. Thinking back to what I have used to keep those running, shaving gel and water, transmission fluid, motor oil, pine-sol and water, straight water (does not last long, really a last ditch thing, but the weapon was full of dust).

If you have broken the seal on any Com-block ammo then the clock is ticking. Old stuff was in spam cans, newer is in plastic. Either way, once the seal is broken it becomes training ammo, or maybe you get a bag sealer and heat seal that stuff back up. If it got wet with hydro or a penetrating lubricant for any reason, it becomes training ammo.

[ 04-05-2010, 01:26 AM: Message edited by: Breacher ]

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Posts: 6705 | From: Western States | Registered: Sep 2002  | Report this post to a Moderator
medic 812
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Well, I'm not going to carry a spam can around in my ruck. So that's out. I will have my rifle's maintenance/cleaning kit so I would have lube and solvent. However, oil can render primers inert. So oiling cases for anything other than the very short term, is probably not advisable. I know the easiest thing would be to buy some brass cased stuff for the particular firearm. But, I haven't seen any 7.62x54R in brass.

By the way, I was just wondering how the Commies got around the steel case rust problem for my own information. My main weapon is an M1A for which I have plenty of brass 7.62x51.

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Sisu
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I would pack it in plastic bags with silica gel. I don't think the commies worried to much once the can was cracked. They just kept it in the cans until needed. I keep my 7.61x54 in a bandoleer and haven't had any stuff get icky yet but if I was walking around in the rain it might pretty quick. I think the metal is treated as well. Either zinc coated or lacquer coated. Forgive my first post. Had a long day at work and was pounding them down pretty fast [Wink]
Posts: 718 | From: Central Wisconsin | Registered: Feb 2010  | Report this post to a Moderator
Flight-ER-Doc
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quote:
Originally posted by medic 812:
Well, I'm not going to carry a spam can around in my ruck. So that's out. I will have my rifle's maintenance/cleaning kit so I would have lube and solvent. However, oil can render primers inert. So oiling cases for anything other than the very short term, is probably not advisable. I know the easiest thing would be to buy some brass cased stuff for the particular firearm. But, I haven't seen any 7.62x54R in brass.

By the way, I was just wondering how the Commies got around the steel case rust problem for my own information. My main weapon is an M1A for which I have plenty of brass 7.62x51.

The ammo isn't going to rust in any relatively short period if you keep it dry.

And oil isn't as bad as everyone has been told:

http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/bot39.htm

--------------------
Emergency Medicine - saving the world from themselves, one at a time.

"Thou shalt not be a victim, thou shalt not be a perpetrator, but, above all, thou shalt not be a bystander."

I make the ADL soil themselves. And that makes me very happy :)

Posts: 1949 | From: Slipping the surly bonds of earth | Registered: Dec 2004  | Report this post to a Moderator
Rudy
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quote:
Originally posted by Breacher:

Unwritten rule of keeping up volume of fire with full autos: lube the damn ammo, especially belted ammo. If my M60 was not dripping CLP, the A-gunner was not putting enough on the belt. ...(does not last long, really a last ditch thing, but the weapon was full of dust).

That must be an unwritten rule as I've seen just the opposite written. Ammo must be kept clean and dry. Oil can and will contaminate the primmer and the powder.

--------------------
Rudy out
"Once the pin is pulled, Mr. Handgrenade is no longer our friend."

Posts: 2113 | From: 43BN-37FF | Registered: Feb 2004  | Report this post to a Moderator
patriotnwi
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I don't drench them in oil... If the cases have become rusty, then I use the steel wool and wipe clean with a oil cloth. This slightly lubes a already oxidized course steel surface and will allow it cycle easier. Now, if using a loose AK47 action, it might just run the rusty ammo without cleaning, but if it's being shot through a tighter action like a AR, you better do some cleaning of the ammo if it has been left in the elements... For reloaded brass cased ammo that I am putting up for storage, I will use some nail polish over the primer area and where the bullet meets the brass to give it a bit of a seal against moisture...

and for the 7.62 by 54R, Seller & Bloit manufacterers brass cased/ reloadable ammo for your caliber rifle... Seen some at Cabelas...

Posts: 732 | From: Republic of Indiana | Registered: Oct 2001  | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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