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Author Topic: Should Judge Roy Moore Withdraw?
airforce
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Let me begin with a huge disclaimer: I never liked Judge Roy Moore. I'm a libertarian, so that's pretty much a given. I certainly respect his personal views - but if you're a judge, you're not supposed to let your personal views interfere with the law. I don't mind that he went against the feds in a couple cases, in fact I applaud it. But if you're going against federal law, it should be to protect personal freedoms, not restrict it.

With that being said, I'm a little torn on this. It's funny that his accuser would come public with this 40 year old claim RIGHT NOW, rather than 40 years ago, or even ten years ago. This is all just a little damn suspicious.

At the same time, he admittedly had a thing for teenage girls, which is just plain creepy. I liked teenage girls too, when I was a teenager. By the time I was in my 30's, my tastes had changed.

We can't just react to every unprovable claim, or no one would ever get elected. But, well, Judge Moore is just a little too creepy and, considering his own admissions, the charge is somewhat believable.

At this stage, it really boils down to what is best for the Republican Party, and it would probably be best for Judge Moore to step down. Whether the charge is true or not, he's damaged goods. It's certainly unfair if he's innocent, and maybe it would set a horrible precedent, but that would be the best thing for the Republican Party.

Judge Moore should step down. If the charge is phony, he could pursue the case against the Washington Post in civil court. It sucks for him, but that would be best for the GOP, and maybe the country.

I'm probably in a minority on this, but I'm used to being in the minority. If you disagree, fire away. I'm a big boy, I can take it. [Wink]

Onward and upward,
airforce

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ConSigCor
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The timing of this is entirely too convenient.

And, look at the source...WAPO...that pillar of journalistic integrity.

There are also numerous reports that WAPO PAID the first woman $1000 for her "story". It is also reported that all these women are democratic operatives. In at least one case this has been confirmed.

And again...the timing...if I was as upset as some of these women claim, I would not have waited 40 years to complain. That alone makes their story smell like BS to me.

Moore says the claims are false, and if that is true, then there is no way I would back down. I'd demand they prove it and sue WAPO for every dime I could squeeze out of them.

quote:
...what is best for the republican party
?

Who cares. That bunch of repugnant losers despise people like Moore because he isn't part of their good ol boy, neo-con, RINO club. I hope all the establishment loose their ass come the next election.

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"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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airforce
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I actually agree, on all of your points. But if Moore stays in and ends up losing to the Democrat, it won't make much difference. The GOP majority in the Senate is already hair thin, and losing this seat would pretty much doom any chance of eventually repealing ObamaCare, and may doom tax reform as well.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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Mitch McConnell says he believes the women making the accusations, and now Attorney general Jeff Sessions says he has "no reason to doubt" the accusers. Those aren't exactly ringing endorsements for Roy Moore.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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ConSigCor
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Like I said...

quote:
he isn't part of their good ol boy, neo-con, RINO club
http://yellowhammernews.com/faithand...shington-post/


J. Pepper Bryars: Why Alabamians won’t believe the Washington Post’s story about Roy Moore (even if it’s true)


My first thought after reading the Washington Post’s story alleging that Roy Moore preyed upon teenaged girls was … this sounds believable.

Why would a woman, multiple women, in fact, fabricate such a story? The thought of electing such a man to the U.S. Senate from Alabama made me sick to my stomach.

My second thought was … this sounds believable, but is it? The thought of reflexively questioning an apparently solid piece of journalism made me even sicker.

Here’s why:

— I don’t believe in wild conspiracy theories and those who peddle them should be drummed out of the conservative movement. And sticking one’s fingers in one’s ears and shouting “Fake News!” is a simple and sure way to become an ignorant person.

— Conservatives should only be concerned with the truth, even if it hurts our candidates, our campaigns, or even our cause. We cannot ignore truth just because it’s uncomfortable, it challenges our conclusions, or if it comes from an unsavory or untrustworthy source.

It’s difficult, but we must sort through these things. Truth is hardly ever served up on a silver platter, just the way we ordered.

But …

Why are we only just now learning about such a damning allegation against a man who has been the target of both parties for decades?

The establishment and moderate wings of the Republican Party have tried to yank Moore off the political stage for years, and the Democrats hate the man with the fire of a thousand suns. They’ve each thrown everything they could at the judge, from saying he has shady financial arrangements to questioning his mental stability.

Nothing stuck.

Yet now we’re to believe that it was “common knowledge” around Etowah County that Moore dated teenagers when he was in his 30s?

Now we’re to believe that what couldn’t be uncovered by years of attempts by local and statewide Republicans and Democrats somehow suddenly falls into the lap of an outsider who spent a few short weeks asking questions in Etowah County?

Maybe we should. Maybe we shouldn’t.

But one thing is for sure: Alabamians won’t believe anything printed in the Washington Post.

Here’s why:

— For decades its editors and reporters have attacked our history, our heritage and our culture.

— They ridicule our beliefs. They make fun of our people. They think our way of life is backward and offensive.

— They stand against what we wish to advance, and they advocate for what we wish to halt.

— They published story after story painting conservatives and conservatism in a negative light, while either ignoring the blinding faults within progressivism or blatantly promoting its champions.

Folks, they can’t stand us.

And they hate … and I mean hate … people like Roy Moore.

They long ago lost any objectivity they may have had about the judge, and their worldview may have dulled their skepticism or at the very least their sense of balance.

We know the media has mistreated the judge in the past. They have portrayed his positions as politically vulgar while many Alabamians have viewed them as courageous acts in defense of our liberties and our culture.

So one must wonder, would the Washington Post treat a damning allegation against Roy Moore with the same degree of skepticism as one made against his opponent, Doug Jones? Would their personal bias make them too willing to believe the charges, or worse, make them fall victim or become an accomplice to a political hit job?

That’s why when most Alabamians read the story last week, they considered the source, and that source is an untrusted and at times hostile actor.

That’s awful. Because we need someone, somewhere, to play it straight down the middle. Just the facts, ma’am. Let us decide.

Sadly, that kind of journalism may no longer exist. Perhaps it never did.

And that’s what makes me sickest of all because our republic depends upon good journalism. Our framers – who we conservatives nearly deify at times – thought so much of the press that it’s the only profession mentioned in our constitution.

When I was younger and more idealistic, I thought of the press as guardians of the truth, keeping it safe and clean from those who would lie and distort.

But like the little boy who guarded the sheep, the Washington Post has cried “Wolf!” one too many times.

Even if this wolf is real, the townspeople aren’t coming.

And the truth, like the sheep, may get torn to pieces.

[ 11-14-2017, 09:49 AM: Message edited by: ConSigCor ]

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"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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airforce
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Roy Moore should be a clergyman, not a judge or senator. But Sean Hannity and Alabama Republicans are sticking up for him. The most bizarre defense came from the state auditor, Jim Ziegler, who accepts that Moore is guilty, but said this:

quote:
Mary was a teenager and Joseph was an adult carpenter. They became parents of Jesus. There’s just nothing immoral or legal here.
Um, Joseph didn't seduce Mary, or try to seduce her. Mary was a virgin, and Joseph married her to protect her. If Judge Moore did what he is accused of, there is definitely something illegal and immoral here.

Is Moore guilty? I don't know. But even Ted Cruz is asking him to step aside, and if you've lost Cruz...

Onward and upward,
airforce

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The Answer
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Like airforce, not a fan of Roy Moore.

Timing is odd, yes. But the timing is always odd, isn't it? If you're a public official, whether that is State Supreme Court Justice or senate candidate or town dogcatcher, is there every really a time for one of these stories that isn't odd?

If this story came out when Roy Moore was up for judicial election (they elect their supreme court justices in Alabama, which I find really, really, silly) the multiple times that has happened, wouldn't the argument of the timing being odd still count?

I mean when is it not an odd time to attack a person who is constantly seeking elected office and public support? It's ALWAYS inconvenient.

Anyway, I couldn't care less about the R vs D makeup of any branch of government at any level at this point. We're so boned that the only thing the two parties are fighting for is the future perceived blame for what is coming next.

Congratulations, you won the election! Now when it goes to shit, people will curse YOUR name! Good work!

I am about as cynical as it gets these days.

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Semper vigilantes, numquam exspectantes

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ConSigCor
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Stepson of Roy Moore Accuser Says She’s LYING – ‘I STAND BEHIND THE JUDGE 100%’ (VIDEO)

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"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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airforce
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That is the accuser who made her announcement while standing beside Gloria Allred. I was already taking her story with a grain of salt. But the story about the 14-year old is... troubling.

The main thing that bothers me about Moore stepping down is that we would have essentially convicted him based on an accusation. It would be like Washington D.C. and Hollywood morphed together into one huge monstrosity.

But then, is a lot of ways, they already have.

Whatever happens, this is going to leave a bad taste in my mouth.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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Judge Moore denies ever meting either of his accusers, and that could be a problem. He had an opportunity to meet both of them and, if it can be verified by a witness, his denial flies out the window.

 -

quote:
Roy Moore does not deny that he dated teenagers when he was a local prosecutor in his early 30s. But the Republican Senate candidate vehemently denies that he initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old girl at his home and that he sexually assaulted a 16-year-old girl outside the restaurant where she worked. He goes further than that, denying that he ever met either woman. Which could be a problem for him.

Referring to Leigh Corfman, the woman who said Moore dated her when she was 14 and during one encounter touched her over her bra and panties after stripping down to his underwear, the former chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court told Sean Hannity: "The allegations are completely false. I don't know Miss Corfman from anybody. I've never talked to her. I've never had any contact with her....I never knew this woman. I never met this woman."

As I noted on Sunday, that denial contradicts not just Corfman but her mother, Nancy Wells, who describes a 1979 encounter with Moore at the Etowah County Courthouse in which he offered to sit with Leigh during her mother's child custody hearing. So far no other witnesses to that encounter have emerged, but The Washington Post confirmed that Wells did have a hearing at the courthouse that day.

Potentially even riskier for Moore is his blanket denial of contact with Beverly Young Nelson, who at a press conference on Monday said Moore attacked her when she was 16 after offering her a ride home from the Olde Hickory House, a restaurant on Meighan Boulevard in Gadsden where she worked as a waitress after school. According to Nelson, Moore parked his car behind the restaurant, where he groped her breasts, grabbed her neck, and pushed her head toward his crotch. Nelson said he eventually relented in the face of her resistance and let her out of the car.

As with Corfman, Moore says he never met Nelson. "I can tell you without hesitation this is absolutely false," Moore told reporters on Monday. "I never did what she said I did. I don't even know the woman. I don't know anything about her." He also claimed to be unfamiliar with the Olde Hickory House, saying, "I don't even know where the restaurant is or was."

Nelson, by contrast, said, "Mr. Roy Moore was a regular customer. He came in almost every night and would stay until closing time. He sat at the counter in the same seat night after night. I remember exactly where he sat." If Moore "came in almost every night," it seems likely that someone else at the restaurant, an employee or a customer, can recall seeing him there.

Moore, an assistant district attorney who had graduated from West Point and served in Vietnam before attending law school at the University of Alabama, was well-known locally. "I knew that he was the district attorney in Etowah County," Nelson said. "I did not understand what that meant, but I knew that he was an important person and I always treated him with respect." When Moore signed a yearbook that she had brought to work, she said, "I felt honored that Mr. Moore, who was such an important person, would write in my yearbook."

Moore, who says he never met Nelson, obviously has to deny that he signed her yearbook. A letter that Moore's lawyer sent yesterday to the Alabama Media Group, threatening a defamation lawsuit over AL.com's coverage of the allegations against the candidate, says the yearbook was signed "in a manner that experts, to include our own, have confirmed is not consistent with his handwriting (To wit: structure, strokes, slant, base alignment, etc.) and does not comport to his typical vernacular." But a bigger danger for Moore than a disputed autograph is the possibility that someone else who worked or ate at the Olde Hickory House in 1977 can testify that, contrary to his unambiguous denial, Moore was a customer there.

Eating at the Olde Hickory House, like chatting with a woman and her teenaged daughter at the courthouse, is not a crime and in itself would not prove the charges against Moore. But if it becomes clear that he is lying about these otherwise innocent details, the only plausible explanation will be that he is also lying when he denies victimizing these women.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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Does a sexual assault by a democrat cancel out a child molestation by a Republican?

 -

No. They're both turds. They should both quit.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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On Roy Moore's Constitutional Ignorance is a new essay by Jonathon Adler, law professor at Case Western University School of Law.

quote:
When former Alabama Supreme Court chief justice Roy Moore won the Republican Senate primary in Alabama, conservative politicians rushed to endorse him. Citing his alleged fealty to the Constitution and the rule of law, they urged Alabama voters to support him. Former House speaker Newt Gingrich even praised Moore as a “constitutional scholar.” They should have known better.

Long before allegations surfaced that Moore had a penchant for “dating” teenage girls, it should have been clear that he was no champion of the rule of law. Indeed, as I explain in the Weekly Standard, it should have been evident that Moore has no particular commitment to the Constitution, if he even understands it.

Moore cites those constitutional provisions he finds amenable and completely disregards those he finds inconvenient or objectionable. Worse, he clings to the mistaken belief that a state judge may disregard a federal court order just because he thinks the federal courts are wrong. Yet that’s not how our system works. Indeed, it’s not how our system has ever worked.

From the article:

quote:
Our federal system readily accommodates differences in state laws. It is one of its virtues. Different parts of the country can adopt and enforce those laws that are most in line with local preferences. Federal law, however, is of a different nature. When laws are enacted by Congress, they are the “supreme law of the land”—and a law can hardly be “supreme” if it means something different in different places. Thus, a federal judiciary, with the authority to hear cases originating in state courts and overrule decisions on federal law issued by state judges, was essential. Indeed, to some, the lack of a federal judiciary was among the most important reasons to ratify the Constitution. As Alexander Hamilton wrote in Federalist 22, the lack of a federal judiciary “crown[ed] the defects” of the Articles of Confederation.

“The responsibility to administer the justice system of the State of Alabama is a power clearly not delegated to the federal government under the U.S. Constitution,” Moore argued in his defense. True enough, but the “supremacy clause” in Article VI provides that federal law is “the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.

Moore’s defenders sometimes seek to explain his actions by citing Abraham Lincoln’s harsh criticism of the Supreme Court’s decision in Dred Scott v. Sanford. Lincoln believed the 1857 decision was wrong and, when president, argued he was under no obligation to follow the court’s holding in the performance of his official duties. In contrast to Moore, however, Lincoln never claimed the authority to reject a court order. To the contrary, he acknowledged “decisions must be binding in any case upon the parties to a suit as to the object of that suit.”

Put another way, where federal courts have jurisdiction, federal court decisions trump state court decisions — and may bind state officeholders — not because our system presumes that the federal court system is more likely to reach the right answer on federal questions, but because federal questions need to have a single, uniform answer that applies throughout the nation.

It’s nice that Republican officeholders and political leaders are finally realizing that Moore is not the sort of person who should sit in the Senate. It’s a shame it took salacious accusations about decades-old conduct for them to realize it.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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ConSigCor
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Breaking News Flash:

Bugs Bunny has just announced that he was molested by Elmer Fudd in Jan 1957. Film at eleven.

--------------------
"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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airforce
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I would have figured it was the other way around. [Big Grin]

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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However, is all seriousness, Pepe le Pew committed at least one sexual assault in every cartoon.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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discollector
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I was lurking on this site and this thread made me sign up because I could not keep my .02 cents to myself.

I got involved in the militia in 1987 because I really wanted to preserve, protect and defend the Constitution when the federal government would not and could not.

Among the things that really irk me is the assaults on principles like the Presumption of Innocence / Innocent Until Proven Guilty.

When we hold trials in public and act as judge, jury and executioner, the accused is only going through the motions at their real trial.

I will have no part of a public lynching whether I like Roy Moore or not. This may sound harsh, but people should be required to report a rape or sexual assault within a specified period of time OR face charges of not reporting the crime.

The crap of waiting until decades after the alleged event and trying to cash in at opportune times disrupts the entire political process. Sexual assaults and rapes are too serious to be used as tools of political guerrilla warfare. IF the accused is later innocent, the public has already destroyed the individual. As a patriot, a militiaman and an American I will have no part in this kind of kangaroo court style justice.

--------------------
For God and country

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airforce
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First of all, welcome to AWRM! We hope you like it here. [Smile]

I can certainly see why the victim would not want to report it. If you were a 14 year old girl, and the bad guy was the District Attorney, who do you think would believe you? And even if you did manage to get a police officer to believe you, what police officer would arrest the District Attorney based on one 14 year old's statement? And what would the District Attorney do in retaliation, to her and her family?

We can all agree that the timing of her making this public is suspicious. But as The Answer pointed out, it would be suspicious whenever she made it public.

I'm no saying I believe her, or him. But he did admit to a (rather creepy) predilection for teenage girls. That alone is not grounds for his dropping out, but it does give me pause. And, well, I just didn't care for Judge Moore in the first place, so take this for what it's worth.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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discollector
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quote:
Originally posted by airforce:
First of all, welcome to AWRM! We hope you like it here. [Smile]

I can certainly see why the victim would not want to report it. If you were a 14 year old girl, and the bad guy was the District Attorney, who do you think would believe you? And even if you did manage to get a police officer to believe you, what police officer would arrest the District Attorney based on one 14 year old's statement? And what would the District Attorney do in retaliation, to her and her family?

We can all agree that the timing of her making this public is suspicious. But as The Answer pointed out, it would be suspicious whenever she made it public.

I'm no saying I believe her, or him. But he did admit to a (rather creepy) predilection for teenage girls. That alone is not grounds for his dropping out, but it does give me pause. And, well, I just didn't care for Judge Moore in the first place, so take this for what it's worth.

Onward and upward,
airforce

Thanks for the welcome. Even more, thank you for the response. Hope you don't mind a long winded post, but I'd really like to pursue this:

Culture, values and our outlook changes every generation For example, my grand-father was in his 20s when he married my grand-mother. She was 14. That marriage took place in a church. They stayed married and when my grand - father passed my grand - mother never remarried.

Of the nine children my grand - parents had, only one was married more than once and one other of those was an alcoholic. Two became business owners, one married a business owner, one was in the ministry, one was a teacher. There were two factory workers. One was a job hopping alcoholic and one was working a stable job when a car wreck claimed his life in his early 30s.

Now, America wants to open its doors to every race, culture, creed, sexual orientation, political persuasion, and social ideology.

"In Judaism girls reach adulthood at 12 and boys at 13. According to the Talmud, a father is commanded not to let his his daughter marry anyone until she grows up and says, "I want this one"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_views_on_marriage#Child_marriage


"The Muslim jurists agree that the ‘age of marriage’ mentioned here is age of puberty. Shafis alone declare that age of 15 years should be taken as age of marriage. Other branches of Islam don’t give any specific age but agree that age of marriage can be different in different regions depending upon the age of puberty. Furthermore, consent of a Muslim marriage partner is not recognized unless she reaches to the age of puberty."

http://muslim-marriage-guide.com/marriage-age.html

"The age of consent in Mexico is complex. Typically, Mexican states have a "primary" age of consent (which may be as low as 12), and sexual conduct with persons below that age is always illegal. Sexual relations which occur between adults and teenagers under 18 are left in a legal gray area: laws against corruption of minors as well as estupro laws can be applied to such acts, at the discretion of the prosecution. These laws are situational and are subject to interpretation.

The ages of consent in the countries of Central America range from 14 to 18."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ages_of_consent_in_North_America

The age of consent in Alabama is 16. So, while we may try to make a moral argument here, in the grand scheme of things, it is not that unusual to the voting electorate. I guess that is the cost of destroying what was once a Christian nation.

With that aside, what did you find objectionable about Roy Moore? I live in nearby Georgia, but my knowledge is limited to knowing he supported the Ten Commandments and the Second Amendment.

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For God and country

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airforce
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quote:
Originally posted by discollector:
...With that aside, what did you find objectionable about Roy Moore?...

For one thing - and the main thing - the contact was not consensual. And for another, as a District Attorney, he was charged with the duty of prosecuting state crimes. He's just not supposed to be violating the same crimes he's prosecuting.

In "The confessions of St. Augustine" (available online here, but you will almost certainly prefer a printed version), Augustine writes what is widely seen as the first autobiography. He had a lot to confess, since his confession took up 13 books and he wasn't even forty yet.

But anyway, at one point in his twenties, he fell in love with an eight year old girl. Her father favored the union, but the legal age for marriage was ten. Augustine resigned himself to wait until she was old enough to marry (though he never did, because other things were happening in his life).

So yes, morals seemingly do change, especially regarding sex and marriage. Women are no longer considered property (at least in Western nations), gay marriages are no longer shocking to us, women can own property and even vote, and when forms ask us for our gender, there are three or more options. Heck, women in Saudi Arabia can even drive now!

(We can argue about whether any or all of these changes are good. Philosophically, as a libertarian, I always favor individual choice over state law. Morally, yes, I have a problem with a couple of them, or at least find them irritating. But that's not what this post is about.)

Will liaisons with 14 year old girls become the norm again in the future? My ESP has never been good for much of anything, I don't know. But I'd be willing to bet that her consent will always be required. And it is illegal now, at least in Alabama.

Whether he did it is something that I don't know. But Moore, according to the polls, is now trailing the Democrat in the race. That's a pretty good indication that folks in Alabama don't believe him and sort of wish he would go away.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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Right on schedule, another woman has come forward accusing Sen. Al Franken of inappropriately touching her. And this time, he was a senator at the time.

For the Democrats, Franken's seat is pretty safe. If Al Franken resigns, his seat will almost certainly remain in Democrat hands.

This could get interesting.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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discollector
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I was trying to find if there were a reason, other than the sexually related charges that Moore was not a good candidate and, if so, what was the reasoning?

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For God and country

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airforce
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quote:
Originally posted by discollector:
I was trying to find if there were a reason, other than the sexually related charges that Moore was not a good candidate and, if so, what was the reasoning?

I don't have anything personally against Roy Moore, other than he clearly doesn't think much of libertarians. I have no problem with Roy Moore going up against the federal government - but if you do so, it should be to enhance and protect individual rights, not restrict them.

Roy Moore is a judge, and should understand not only the power of state's rights, but their limitations as well. A state judge, even a state Supreme Court judge, cannot disregard a federal court order simply because he thinks the federal court is wrong. The "supremacy clause" in Article VI binds the judges in every state court to obey federal laws, even if they go against the laws of any State - and even if they go against the State Constitution.

Put another way, federal courts trump state courts, and it has been so ever since the Constitution was adopted.

We can all think, right off the top of our heads, of instances where we disagree with this. And when we do, it behooves us to change the federal law, not disregard it. A state supreme court judge should understand this, and if he doesn't, then he clearly has little understanding of the Constitution. And if he doesn't, then how much more of the Constitution doesn't he understand? And do we really want someone with that little knowledge of the Constitution to be a Senator? Or a judge?

Don't get me wrong, I was no fan of his primary opponent Luther Strange either. If Moore really is innocent of wrongdoing with teenage girls, then he would make a perfectly fine clergyman. But a a judge or a senator, not so much.

For what it's worth, there is a good alternative running for Alabama Senator, Ron Bishop. Thanks to Alabama's atrocious ballot access laws, he's forced to run as a write-in candidate, but if I lived in Alabama, that's who I would vote for.

(For that matter, Jeff Sessions would be a decent alternative as well. Not because Jeff Sessions is a good senator, but at least he wouldn't be Attorney General.)

I'm sorry I misunderstood your question earlier, I hope this helps.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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ConSigCor
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Now, 8 women are accusing Charlie Rose of NPR and CBS of sexual harassment.

Although I think it's funny when it comes back to bite the dems...It never ends.

Next, you'll automatically be guilty just because you're a male.

--------------------
"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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airforce
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I just heard that. Remember when fads used to be harmless, like those stupid Pet Rocks? The 21st Century sure isn't turning out like I hoped.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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ConSigCor
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NPR is just reporting that Mr Rose been suspended by CBS and NPR. Funny..the old prune faced woman who works with Rose now acts like she doesn't know him.

[ 11-20-2017, 04:11 PM: Message edited by: ConSigCor ]

--------------------
"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

Posts: 15262 | From: A 059 Btn 16 FF MSC | Registered: Oct 2001  | Report this post to a Moderator
airforce
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quote:
Originally posted by ConSigCor:
...Funny..the old prune faced woman who works with Rose now acts like she doesn't know him.

[Big Grin]

If the conservatives and liberals finally both self-destruct, all of us wild-eyed, long-haired, gun-totin', ass-grabbing Libertarians will have an easy time of it.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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Now it's John Conyers in the hot seat. He's 88 years old, I'm not sure how much good he would be at sexual harassment, but it apparently bothered the women quite a bit.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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There are so many sex assault cases in Hollywood that the LAPD has realigned its detective staff to deal with all of them.

quote:
The flood of sexual assault allegations coming out of the Hollywood entertainment industry has the Los Angeles Police Department negotiating uncharted territory.

Never before has the department received so many sexual assault allegations involving high-profile figures at one time, including many complex cases that are years old with multiple alleged victims, officials say.

The department has re-engineered its detective staff to deal with the influx. The LAPD has established five teams of two detectives to exclusively investigate allegations of sexual misconduct in Hollywood. The team includes members of the cold-case unit, because these detectives are experts in dealing with old criminal allegations that lack physical evidence.

“They know where to go. They know how to jog people’s memories,” said LAPD Capt. Billy Hayes, who oversees the Robbery-Homicide division and is managing the task force. “We’ve [gotten] an unprecedented number of calls.”

The LAPD now has 28 open investigations related to Hollywood and media figures, including mogul Harvey Weinstein, actor Ed Westwick, writer Murray Miller and agent Tyler Grasham. The department has also taken 37 other sex crimes reports that it has sent to other law enforcement agencies, believing the alleged crimes occurred in those jurisdictions....

Onward and upward,
airforce

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