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Author Topic: The Death of Cash
Breacher
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Okay, looks like they are not wasting time.

Cash counterfeiting is an ongoing issue, but I always knew the move to a cashless economy of economic control was going to be facilitated with a war on cash, and most likely some sort of big attack on cash itself by declaring a large portion of it counterfeit.

Apparently a bunch of "high quality" fake currency is circulating in the "Bay area" (We assume SF bay area from the news article and pictures show the new style hundreds which I know to be nearly impossible to print fakes.

The issue though is that someone connected with government can come up with bills they put a little variance into and then simply declare as "not good'. The new rule is that if you are holding the fake currency, you are stuck with the responsibility.

Realizing the damage it could do to the off grid economy, I never supported counterfeiting efforts the way some anti-banking and anti-conspiracy people in the 1980s did.

I am already shitlisted off a lot of those financial systems that are "progressive friendly" like paypal, and notice how every time an alternative to paypal came up, it got sabotaged.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKmjvTVJyTc

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Life liberty, and the pursuit of those who threaten them.

Trump: not the president America needs, but the president America deserves.

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ConSigCor
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What Happened When I Tried to Take $1500 Cash Out of Bank of America-Bank Holiday is Near


A funny thing happened on my way to writing on a very controversial topic. It just so happens that I inadvertently made my own news. To those who expected to read how the criminal elite are going stop Donald Trump short of singular assassination plot, that story will be printed on this site, tomorrow.

Yesterday, I went to Bank of America to withdraw $1500 cash. You would of thought I had a sign around my neck saying that I was a heroin dealer.

The teller went and got a bank officer who began to question me:

Bank Officer: Sir, what are you using the money for?

Me: I am using it for a legal personal matter. Beyond that, it is none of your business.

Bank Officer; Sir, we can put a hold on your account.

Me: Mr. Bank Officer, I will remove my entire account and deposit it to another bank if I do not have my money in five minutes and I want my money in $100 bills.

Bank Officer: Sir, your threats will not work here and if you are not cooperative and fill out this form, I will call the police and notifiy the IRS. (He wanted me to fill out a Cash Transaction Report which is not required unless your withdrawing $10,000 or more)

Me: Mr. Bank Officer, I refuse to fill out your report because it is not required unless I withdraw $10,000 and your may call who you want…. You obviously do not know the law and who I am. Between my writing and broadcasting, I reach over 2 million people per month. I would say that statistically about 400,000 people have B of A accounts who listen to me or read my articles. Before the end of this month, you will see sizable withdrawals based upon my recantation of this conversations in the public domain. By the way, I am recording this.

The bank officer walked away and disappeared and then came back in a few moments. He instructed the teller to process my request.

Bank Officer: I have reviewed your account history and you have been an excellent customer. You are obviously using the money for honorable purposes. I apologize for any misunderstanding.

Me: Thank you. The purposes for the use of my money, is none of your business, it is a matter for law enforcement. You should think about this when you try to bully the next guy.

I am certain that the threat of my reach and potential action against Bank of America did not influence bank officer’s decision to honor my request. I am sure he called his boss and that they have now filed a Suspicious Activity Report (SAR), and my business affairs will come under the scrutiny of the IRS and possibly the FBI. I have no doubt that they would love to turn me into the next Bundy family member of the banking world. I will have more to say on this topic later in the article.

An Interesting Aside

I requested that my money withdrawal be disbursed in one hundred dollar bills. They had one, count it, one, one hundred dollar bill in the entire bank.

I asked the teller if the bank was making good on the rumor that they were phasing out one hundred dollar bills in their incremental move towards a cashless society. The $10 per hour teller said she they did not know what I was talking about. At that point, and being a little worked up, I asked the teller which arm she was going receive the chip so she could continue buying and selling and working for B of A? She had no idea what I was talking about.

“Forgive them Father, for they know not what they do.” I had images of my Lord and Savior chasing the banksters from the Temple.

If I only had the courage of my Lord.

I have arranged for a transfer of the funds from the impacted account.

Before you move any money, you need to read the following… or you risk going to jail:

Be Careful Who You Speak With

If the Feds do show up to speak with me, I will not be speaking with them about anything of substance. When Martha Stewart was accused of insider trading, Stewart tried to explain away the concerns. That was her big mistake. She was sent to jail for making false statements to federal officials. Note, they can lie to you and try to trick you and the criminal elite have made that legal. But if THEY say you have misled them, or left out one detail, you go to prison and it is your word vs. their word.

When and if the FEDS show up at my door. I will be taping and recording myself saying “I invoke my 5th Amendment right against self-incrimination and reserve my right to be represented by an attorney for all questioning. If I am not under arrest, you need to leave my property and I will arrange a meeting with my attorney.” If you say any more, you are probably going to jail.

Oh, they will threaten you that you making things hard on yourself and that “things will go easier if you cooperate”. Your answer , and the only thing you should say is “I will fully cooperate with you when my attorney is present and since we all have to abide the Constitution, get the hell out of my house”.


Structuring, SAR’s and CTR’s

Previously, I mentioned the bank probably filed a SAR on me. and they going to be investigating me for Structuring. Structuring carries a very long prison sentence to go with a hefty fine. The Federal government will automatically investigate any cash withdrawal of $10,000 or more from your account.To remain in compliance with the law, financial institutions must obtain personal identification, information about the transaction and the social security number of the person conducting the transaction.

Technically, there is no federal law prohibiting the use of large amounts of cash. However, a CTR must be filed in ALL cases of cash transaction regardless of the reason underlying the transaction. This means your cash transaction will be on the radar. The Feds will automatically investigate you drug dealing, enterprise corruption and/or money laundering. And they can put a lien on everything you own during the investigative process. Remember, keep your mouth shut!

There will undoubtedly be some geniuses whose math ability will tell them that all they have to do is to withdraw $9,999.99 and the bank and the guardian of the bank, the federal government will be none the wiser. It is not quite that simple. If over a period of 12 months, you show a pattern of cash withdrawals which fall under the $10,000 threshold of a Cash Transaction Report requirement, you will be convicted of Structuring and go to jail, every time. Therefore, I do not dare go back to any bank with my name on it and make a similar withdrawal. So long as I do not go to a bank in the next 12 months and make a similar withdrawal, the government cannot make a case against me Structuring because it requires multiple withdrawals over a discreet period of time.

Structuring transactions to prevent a CTR from being reported can result in imprisonment for not more than five years and/or a fine of up to $250,000. If structuring involves more than $100,000 in a twelve month period or is performed while violating another law of the federal government (e.g. money laundering, drug dealing, etc.), the penalty is doubled.

What Should You Do With Your Cash In the Bank?

Before, I suggest what one should do with their cash in the bank, I want to make the readers fully aware of how the banking system, along with the muscle provided by the Federal government, have made definitive plans to steal your cash in the bank.

1. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew and the UK’s Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, on November 10, 2014, ran a joint exercise simulating how they would prop up a large bank (e.g. Bank of America) with operations in both countries that has landed itself in trouble. Also taking part in the “bank failure drill”, which included a cyber attack upon several banks, was Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen and Bank of England Governor Mark Carney, and the heads of a large number of other regulators, in a meeting hosted by the U.S. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.

2. As of November 16, 2014, your bank account has been collateralized against the derivatives debt. Hence, you had, in 2008, former CEO of Goldman Sachs and the Secretary of Treasury, Hank Paulson, telling a closed session of Congress that if they did not authorize the bailouts, there would be tanks in the streets in an ultimately, REVOLUTION! This was necessitated by the credit swap derivatives Ponzi scheme and the debacle that would follow the collapse of the dollar.

3. Further, the bankruptcy reform laws stemming from the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 2005, have given the credit swap derivatives counter-parties preference over all other creditors and customers of the bankrupt financial institution, including FDIC insured depositors. This is why the G20 effectively stole your money on the morning of November 16, 2014! On this action taken by the G20 nations, your bank account is no longer considered to be money. The bankers holding the bag on the credit swap derivatives will move to the head of the FDIC compensation line. In other words, if the banks are collapsed, your money will be used to pay down the derivatives debt. Therefore, the regulations requiring that your money be insured by the FDIC are no longer in effect! This devaluation of “money to something other than money gives what the experts call “super priority” in terms of the line of succession from which to collect bankruptcy monies.

The Bank-Bail-ins, or outright cash confiscations are coming. If you do nothing and leave your money in the bank, you and your money will soon be parted. If you recklessly try and withdraw your cash, you and your money will soon be parted and you will be in prison. So what can you do?

As the owner of DH Communication LLC, among other things, we own the exclusive rights to The Common Sense Show. We made a collective decision to primarily advertise for business interests that fits our chartered purpose, namely, to help people prepare to survive what is coming. Therefore, we place a premium on accepting advertising from business entities that increase the odds of survival. You would be wise to avoid banking prison that we all live under and make direct purchases of items that you will need to survive the coming economic calamity.

If you make purchases directly from your bank account for items you will need, you do not have to worry about Federal banking laws. I know that your NSA threat matrix score will go up, but it is the cost of doing business in a chaotic and corrupt country. Before the crash comes, you will need to take care of these six areas.

You will need precious metals- Steve Quayle and Renaissance Precious Metals because your cash will soon be worthless or confiscated. When the cash is gone, you will need a medium of exchange and that will be gold and silver.
You will need survival supplies (e.g. water filters, night vision goggles) when an economic collapse will lead to rioting hordes. This is why I shop at Readymaderesources.com
You will need to store food, so I use Numanna.
In a societal meltdown that will follow a banking collapse, you will need a means to protect your family and your resources. That means you will need guns and gun accessories. For this service I use DETCTactical. And you need to be trained in both tactics and how to use and maintain your weapons.
You will need to stockpile medicine. If you are unable to do that, I would recommend going to Dr. Ted Broer’s Health Masters site and ordering natural products which act in the same capacity without the side-effects. Ted has successfully treated myself for two maladies and has had great results with Doug Hagmann as well. Ted is not yet an advertiser, on my site, but will soon be. When you contact Health Masters, mention Dave Hodges, or coupon code DAVE5 and receive 5% off your purchase price.
The Patriot community needs a social media platform to interact in and to have access to topics which can serve to educate all the millions of people that Donald Trump is awakening. These people will need a place to grow and to learn how to take their place among a growing group of activists. FACEBOOK, with their censorship and spying, is not that place. Seen.life is that place. No spying, no censorship, no selling of your personal information.

Of course, everyone is free to use whatever vendor they choose. However, you need to cover these six critical areas in order to enhance your survival.

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"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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Breacher
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See how that bitch likes the feel of an SEC complaint.

If these fuckers want to play the snitch game and they drop the dime, then there is a process for putting them on the payback is a bitch program.

The laws state that cash is legal tender and the threat of making you a criminal suspect is NOT a legitimate negotiating tactic for use by bank officials to play the "we gonna keep your money" game.

I have people who know various ways to fuck them off for playing that but the methods are not exactly open source.

Right now silver is down. I bought in my most recent batch at a much higher price than it is now and that kinda sucks.

I would say if you have enough to work with, invest right now in something that has cash flow and turnover, not money parking.

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Life liberty, and the pursuit of those who threaten them.

Trump: not the president America needs, but the president America deserves.

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ConSigCor
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LewRockwell.com


Carrying Cash? Be Ready to Lose It

By Mark Nestmann

Nestman.com

December 7, 2016

Don’t trust banks to protect the money you’ve deposited? You’re hardly alone.

From a legal standpoint, the money you deposit in a bank no longer belongs to you. Instead, the bank owns it. You are merely just another one of their unsecured creditors. What’s more, in the event of future bank failures, the US government has now signed an international agreement confirming that it will not pay off depositors. Instead, it will force them to submit to a “bail-in” regime, like bank depositors in Cyprus experienced in 2013.

The bail-in scenario, on top of the lowest interest rates in 5,000 years, has led many bank depositors to make the entirely rational decision to withdraw their savings from banks. They’re taking the cash and storing it, often in a home safe. Indeed, sales of home safes are soaring worldwide.

This behavior deeply disturbs the powers that be. In response, they’ve imposed stricter and stricter controls on cash. I wrote about those controls a year and a half ago, and since then, it’s only gotten worse.

In the US, one strategy the government uses to discourage people from holding cash is a civil forfeiture. Under this Alice-in-Wonderland legal process, cops can seize your cash – or anything else you own – if they believe that it’s somehow connected to a crime… any crime. You don’t need to be convicted, accused, or even arrested for a crime to lose everything you own. SentrySafe HD4100CG Fi... Best Price: $51.48 Buy New $60.57

Consider the case of Emiliano Gomez Gonzolez. During a traffic stop, Nebraska state troopers asked Gonzolez for permission to search his vehicle. During the search, the troopers found bundles of currency totaling $124,700. Based on a dog sniffing narcotics residue on the cash, police seized all the money. This is hardly “proof” that the cash is the proceeds of illegal drug sales; more than 90% of US bills actually contain traces of cocaine.

Gonzolez contested the forfeiture in court. Prosecutors neither convicted nor accused Gonzolez or any of the other owners of the seized cash of any crime. Nor did the police find any drugs, drug paraphernalia, or drug records connected to the cash. Despite these facts, a federal appeals court upheld the confiscation of every dollar found in the vehicle.

Gonzolez was an exception because he fought the seizure of his cash. Most defendants don’t because the burden of proof is reversed in a civil forfeiture case. In a criminal proceeding, you have the right to be presumed innocent until a jury finds you guilty “beyond a reasonable doubt.” If police seize your property in a civil forfeiture, it’s “presumed guilty.” It’s up to you to prove that it’s not associated with a crime. That’s a tall order and a big reason why 80% of forfeiture cases go uncontested.

The procedural rules governing forfeiture cases are also very complex. Only a handful of attorneys are familiar with them, and they charge accordingly for this knowledge. The last time I checked, I couldn’t find an attorney willing to help a client reclaim wrongfully seized property from police for a retainer under $20,000. If you’re poor, like most victims of civil forfeiture, there’s no way you’ll be able to come up with the money to contest the seizure.

The biggest reason cops love civil forfeiture is that the seizing agency generally gets to use the seized property for its own purposes. It’s literally “policing for profit.” While each state has its own rules for what cops can buy with the money they confiscate, pretty much anything goes:

Milwaukee County sheriff’s invested $25,000 in forfeited monies for “customer service training” from the Disney Institute.

Police in Bal Harbour, Florida, with an estimated 2014 population of 2,633, spent $23,000 flying first class to Chicago, Las Vegas, and Los Angeles. On arrival, they drove in style in deluxe vehicles such as a Cadillac SRX and a Lincoln Town Car. The police department later spent $7,000 on a banquet and $21,000 on an “anti-drug beach bash.”

Romulus, Michigan’s police chief used forfeited assets to buy a $75,000 tanning salon for his wife. He spent another $40,000 on marijuana, alcohol, and prostitutes.

A Texas district attorney spent $267,449 in forfeited assets on travel expenses, including numerous junkets to casinos.

Another Texas district attorney treated his office and their spouses to Hawaii for a “law conference.” He paid for it with $27,000 in asset forfeiture proceeds.

The sheriff of Camden County, Georgia, used $90,000 of forfeited assets to buy a Dodge Viper for the county’s Drug Awareness and Resistance Education (DARE) program. He also paid prison inmates $35,000 to build a “very nice party house” for himself.

Admittedly, a few of these purchases broke even the very lax rules for the permissible use of seized assets. For instance, in 2014, the former police chief of Romulus, Michigan, was sent to prison. He and five other officers allegedly embezzled more than $100,000.

But it’s not just state and local governments that are getting in on all the fun. Federal law has authorized civil forfeiture since the dawn of the Republic more than two centuries ago. And it’s become quite profitable. The Department of Justice alone seized more than $4.5 billion in 2014. It’s just one of many federal agencies with the authority to confiscate property under federal civil forfeiture laws.

That should come as no surprise. In 1989, the Supreme Court actually ruled the federal government has a legitimate financial interest to maximize forfeiture revenues. Since then, federal agencies have developed highly sophisticated techniques to do just that.

Trademark Home Diction... Buy New $7.68 Take the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), for instance. Earlier this year, an investigation revealed that the DEA routinely carries out “data mining” of Americans’ travel information to build profiles of individuals who might be carrying large sums of cash. Using a nationwide network of travel industry informants, the DEA gives special attention to individuals who meet secret “drug courier” profiles, such as buying one-way tickets or purchasing their tickets with cash. Amtrak and airline employees who pass information on to the DEA are eligible for generous commissions if the tip leads to a seizure.

Over the last decade, the agency has seized at least $209 million in cash from 5,200 passengers. In the vast majority of cases, the passengers weren’t arrested; they were given a receipt for the seized cash and sent on their way. For instance, of 1,600 DEA forfeitures in Los Angeles in the last 10 years, only one was in connection with a criminal investigation.

Are you outraged? You should be – and it’s probably about to get worse. President-elect Donald Trump has proposed a “Restoring Community Safety Act” that he claims will reduce “surging” crime in America’s cities. But the fact is that violent crime nationwide has actually been falling for the last 25 years. Given the love affair police at all levels of government have for civil forfeiture, it’s inconceivable that a Trump anti-crime bill won’t further unleash the forfeiture squads in America.

But there’s no law – yet – that says you can’t move a portion of your assets outside the US to countries that don’t have civil forfeiture laws (most don’t). Even if you don’t fit the “profile” for a civil forfeiture – and you probably do, because it’s so broad – you should seriously consider international diversification. A Plan B, if you will.

Today couldn’t be soon enough to begin putting it in place.

[ 12-11-2016, 08:48 AM: Message edited by: ConSigCor ]

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"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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Breacher
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I can have a lot to say about this, but I am done giving that advice for free.

There are ways to beat the forfeiture system which don't involve some slick bitch fake attorney who is going to have you sign all of your assets over to some mafia guy in California...

As for cash seizure. Most of that comes from people too lazy to take certain steps in protecting it. Unfortunately, some aspects of that are constantly changing as the US goes into third world mode in a lot of places. Hate to say it so openly, but that often goes right along with the demographics of those in charge of terminals and places where the money might make it through.

On those old videos where you saw the Ron Paul people being harassed for carrying cash at airports, notice the ethnic demographics that were involved...

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Life liberty, and the pursuit of those who threaten them.

Trump: not the president America needs, but the president America deserves.

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Breacher
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I just got word today from some fairly well informed contacts that the democrat strategy most likely to cause real trouble is an engineered economic collapse that is scheduled to hit at some point shortly before Trump hits 90 days in office.

Too soon and Obama gets blamed for it, too late and the shitheads won't have enough time to implement their "solutions" before Trumps policies really take effect. A bunch of the think tank people keep banging on that sort of timeline.

Personally, I think it's bullshit and won't succeed, but it will be tried. Soros money is flowing like crazy right now among the SJWs and they are building up manpower for something.

It's not just Soros either. The rest of the rich liberals are throwing money around, issuing grants and paychecks for activism.

Whatever it is, it will likely be short brutal and temporary, but if you are caught off guard, you could be financially screwed.

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Life liberty, and the pursuit of those who threaten them.

Trump: not the president America needs, but the president America deserves.

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airforce
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It won't be an "engineered" economic collapse. Politicians couldn't engineer their way out of a paper sack. But certainly the Dow Jones is not going to keep rising a hundred points every day.

I'm betting on some sort of a recession early in trump's term. And it won't even be on account of anything he does. Presidents try to leave office on a high note, so they pump up the economy as much as they can before the election. You can bet Obama as trying to do this, to give Hillary an edge.

It will take time for any tax cuts to go into effect, and longer still before they improve the economy. With the Fed finally raising rates, you get a recession.

How big will it be? It probably won't be a collapse right away, but it could turn into one if investors decide to bail out on risky state bonds. We'll just have to wait and see. But if you own any municipal bonds from Chicago, you might want to sell them now.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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Breacher
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The talk indicates some sort of big stunt and dirty tricks, like flooding the market with counterfeit bills or some foreign thing like an attack on an oil supply, but something sneaky. A regulatory change or something.

Don't. Forget, Brennan is pals with the Saudis, Obama made those back room deals with the Iranians. This might be that deal where they take Oil off the dollar standard but I think the Chinese will be against it.

The situation is complex and my problem is that I am getting things third hand with one of the people who is a go between being a total Psych case who likes to bullshit me. He is in touch with the real deal, but filters the info badly.

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Life liberty, and the pursuit of those who threaten them.

Trump: not the president America needs, but the president America deserves.

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airforce
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A trade war could certainly collapse the economy, and we're seeing some signs of a trade war warming up already. But that would be on Trump, not the Democrats.

Yellen seemed to hint at three more rate hikes coming in the next year, rather than the two the market had already factored in. I'm certainly no big fan of the Federal Reserve, but her remarks today seemed almost bizarre. The economy is doing well? The stock market may be, but little else is.

It will be interesting to hear what Trump says about Yellen's rate hike and her remarks.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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The Answer
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There will be a collapse no matter if it is planned or not. If it is planned, the planners will wish they hadn't. If it is not planned, survivors will wish they did something. Fact is, this way of life is unsustainable and the structural problems cannot be solved by one or two or three administrations. They may delay the inevitable, but if the system itself remains in its core parts, it will go down. The question is: for how long? and how hard?

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Semper vigilantes, numquam exspectantes

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airforce
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quote:
Originally posted by The Answer:
There will be a collapse no matter if it is planned or not. If it is planned, the planners will wish they hadn't. If it is not planned, survivors will wish they did something. Fact is, this way of life is unsustainable and the structural problems cannot be solved by one or two or three administrations. They may delay the inevitable, but if the system itself remains in its core parts, it will go down. The question is: for how long? and how hard?

Very true. The economy is doomed to collapse anyway, because attempts to interfere with the free market are always a mistake - it's like trying to say, "The value of pi is too complicated, so let's just make it 3.0." It doesn't work.

But there is always something that happens right before the collapse that starts the ball rolling. In the case of the USSR, it was a failed coup. What will happen in the U.S.? My ESP has never been that great, but my gut feeling is it will be something to do with trade.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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Breacher
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I am getting drift of a currency problem. Something that would get these pricks to enact the cashless society while the guy nominally in charge is "on our side" and does a bunch of stuff to mitigate the problem, maybe even fight back hard, but whatever it is, it is designed to shake people's faith in cash and could not have been done during the Obama years because "they" didn't want "us" blaming Obama for it.

Between now and the time it hits, the markets will be pretty strong, and I suspect a lot of the big money players are building up their war chest funds to ride this thing out and stay in the game when it does happen.

[ 12-14-2016, 05:06 PM: Message edited by: Breacher ]

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Life liberty, and the pursuit of those who threaten them.

Trump: not the president America needs, but the president America deserves.

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ConSigCor
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The War On Cash And Then On Gold And Silver
Clive Maund
December 19, 2016

The global financial system continues to groan under the strain of the accumulated weight of trillions of dollars of debt and derivatives, which have built up to even more fantastic levels than those that precipitated the near collapse in 2008. And thanks to the policy of solving liquidity problems near-term by creating even more debt and derivatives, Quantitative Easing being the most obvious example. However, while the majority consider the situation to be hopeless, there is actually “light at the end of the tunnel.”

If only a way could be found to freely tap the funds of savers at will, by imposing duties or taxes on bank accounts with the additional option to appropriate savers’ funds on occasion as required. Subsequently, the systemic liquidity problems will be solved. Banks need never fear solvency problems again. Consequently, they can simply fall back on the account holder’s funds to meet any obligations. There are in fact already names for these restorative operations, they are called “bails-ins” and NIRP (Negative Interest Rate Policy).

Unfortunately, any immediate attempt to implement bail-ins and NIRP on a large scale will backfire because, faced with being charged significant sums for the privilege of keeping their money in the bank, savers will simply withdraw their funds and keep as cash at home. Alternatively, they may even invest in Precious Metals. It is therefore imperative that these escape routes are blocked off.

We have already seen an interesting “trial balloon” in recent years with respect to bails-ins. This was the celebrated Cyprus bail-in. When Cyprus banks were about to go belly up a couple of years ago, they saved themselves by raiding customers’ accounts, which is more palatably described as a bail-in. The reaction of global savers to this action by the Cyprus banks was one of horror and revulsion - and they made it plain that they weren’t going to stand idly by and watch banks plunder their funds. They would withdraw them as cash if any such threat should appear over the horizon. This reaction set the great minds of the banking community to work on how to stop savers withdrawing their funds in the face of these threats. The solution was and is simple – abolish cash! Thus we have seen production of the 500 Euro note in the European Union stopped…so that it gradually fades into oblivion. In the US, Larry Summers has proposed abolition of the $100 bill, which accounts for most of the money in circulation. The idea is to implement the policy for a global cashless society in stages…because if it is done all at once, the public will revolt. They need to be trained to go cashless and this will take time. By starting with high denomination notes you actually remove most of the currency in circulation at a stroke. However, the masses can still buy cigarettes and candy bars at street corner shops with small denomination notes. The excuse given for the removal of the notes is that it impedes organized crime and money laundering etc, which is of course a convenient smokescreen.

With plans for a cashless society already well advanced, it was time for another trial balloon. India was selected. Anxious to demonstrate his credentials as a card carrying member of the New World Order, and oblivious to the effects of the operation on the hapless citizenry of his country, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi went ahead with the withdrawal of two key banknotes. This caused chaos across the country, especially in rural areas where many don’t even have bank accounts, and citizens often had to travel long distances to get to banks to change these banknotes, only to find that the banks had in many cases run out of smaller denomination notes. Despite the economic dislocation and suffering experienced by the masses including some deaths, the experiment was deemed a success by the elites, as they had gotten away with it, with the cowed and impotent citizenry accepting it as their fate – what they should have done is rioted until the measures were withdrawn. Globally, the plan therefore is to keep chipping away at it until the cashless society is universally accepted, the only cash likely to remain being small denomination notes and coins suitable for paying street vendors and bus fares etc.

The arrival of the cashless society will not only mean that banks will be able to avail themselves of citizens funds as and when they please, it will also mean that the banks, and by extension the government, will know all your financial business, what you do and when. Tax evasion will be impossible, and eventually you will not be able to do business with companies that are not approved of by the government.

With the escape route into cash set to be blocked off, that leaves Precious Metals, gold and silver, gold as a store of value and silver more for everyday transactions. Gold bugs and others, especially survivalists, and many wealthy investors see this as THE way to escape the rapacious grasp of the banks and the government, and are busy squirreling away fortunes into overseas vaults etc. However, it is unfortunate that if you can think of this, so can they, so can the banks and the government, and they have plans for you and your gold hoard. Remember, their power is absolute, no-one dare stand up to them and they can and will do what they like, changing the law as required to suit their purposes. They are much more powerful than President Roosevelt, who in the 1930’s, in an act of naked piracy, seized the gold of US citizens, and furthermore their modern powers of surveillance and tracking are much more sophisticated than anything back then. Thus we can expect governments to declare the holding of gold (and silver) to be illegal, and to demand forfeiture to the government in exchange for nominal compensation. Vendors of gold bars will be closed down and mints will not sell retail gold. Unlike the 1930’s this be a be a coordinated global campaign, a kind of witch hunt if you will, and there will be no corner of the world that is safe, just as they finished off private banking in Switzerland. Those buying gold and stashing it in various pseudo anonymous remote foreign depositories will be in for a nasty shock as these vaults are arbitrarily raided and plundered, with local and international law being changed as required to facilitate this. Nothing will stand in the way of a system that will not permit alternatives.

We will end on a positive note. No-one really wants to see a complete systemic collapse, which is what will happen if banks don’t avail themselves of savers funds quite soon, least of all the controlling elites at the top of the pyramid who live lives of scarcely imaginable opulence and luxury and wish to continue doing so. Such a collapse would lead to bank accounts being frozen, and a breakdown of the distribution system leading to anarchy and hand-to-hand fighting in the streets for essentials like food and gasoline. Should we not therefore be grateful to our illustrious masters who have ingeniously thought of a way out of the current impasse, by availing themselves of your funds as required? Is it not a small price to pay to go cashless and forego your privacy and independence, and forfeit your gold and silver on demand?

It is tempting to blame others for all this, especially those in control of the system. It is imperative we don’t forget that for decades one voted for people who routinely lied before elections, and told you what you wanted to hear, that you could have it all right now and to hell with the future. Well, that future has now arrived.

********

http://www.clivemaund.com

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"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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Breacher
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Silver is either going to bounce back up to $20/oz in the first quarter of 2017 or tank down to around $10-$12. It really depends on the social and economic stability situation. If things stabilize, then we are looking at $10-$12 silver and sub $1000 Gold.

If you are sitting on Gold under those conditions, then the smart play is to flip your gold into silver.

If things get vicious with the banking and global economics, then gold rises, but that would take an upheaval that affects foreign markets. If it's just local or national in the US, then silver can go up. If silver gets into the $25-$35 range and gold is sitting around $1100-$1500, then it may be wise to flip the silver into Gold.

Gold goes up when things happening cause people to want to move cash internationally. That's the issue when say for instance, these liberals want to make good on their promise to relocate out of the country, but we all know that's a bluff.

Right now, I think the best possible thing for most of our guys is to get involved with something which is guaranteed to have an ongoing cash flow but can be expanded or shut down depending on the business flow.

For example, something I am not personally in to, but can work for someone, is owning stainless steel restaurant equipment and service stuff for setting up outdoor kitchens, but in a large enough scale that you can take over an industrial space and turn it into a catering business or event feeding situation in a hurry. Maybe even open a restaurant. The idea of owning the equipment and having the restaurant is that those are normally leased, and if the management screws up, everyone comes and gets their leased equipment back. Granted, some of these predatory property owners go trying to claim it if for instance, the restaurant owner didn't pay rent and the real estate outfit goes claiming adverse possession on the equipment. Same can happen with construction supplies and equipment (happened to me on a bunch of tools). Hence, there are times when you need to flex a little muscle in order to recover your stuff.

That shit tends to not happen when you have someone present and on top of the situation, but few people really want to take that risk. They want guaranteed profit for paper, an income based on past earnings which get ledgered over to some paper institution.

[ 12-21-2016, 01:20 AM: Message edited by: Breacher ]

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In the Banker War on Cash, New Zealand and Canada Are the Next Major Countries on the Banker Hit List


-- Published: Sunday, 29 January 2017
By JS Kim

As we warned more than 4½ years ago in this article here, the criminal banking cartel’s end game involves restricting freedom of speech and curbing any criticism of their criminal banking industry by banning cash and imposing an end game of 100% digital money upon all of us. Now with the benefit of 4½ more years, there can be little doubt that indeed, that the banking industry has advanced their war against all of us by accelerating their war on cash, and attempting to disguise this war on cash as a war on corruption.

Any logical person would understand the vast irony in such a statement, especially since bankers are leading these false charges of a war on cash as a war on corruption, not only given the fact that the banking industry is the most corrupt industry on the planet, but also given the fact that bankers provide much of the dirty money that feeds global stock markets by laundering tons of dirty money for the world’s most violent drug cartels. Recall that in 2012, HSBC bankers had to pay a $1.9B fine for willingly laundering hundreds of millions, and more likely billions of dollars, of dirty money for the largest and most murderous Mexican drug cartels. Though HSBC CEO Stuart Gulliver unconvincingly denied approving of these transactions, any logical person would conclude that it is next to impossible for the CEO of a bank not to know that origin of the source of hundreds of millions of dollars of cash flowing into his bank.

In addition to profiting handsomely by conducting business with the largest, most violent drug cartels in the world, such as the Sinaloa drug cartel, HSBC bankers were also convicted of openly conducting business with terrorists linked to Al-Queda, Hezbollah, and Russian mobsters, and for openly moving money for rogue states like North Korea and the Sudan. In fact, Jack Blum, a former US Senate investigative attorney, stated, “[HSBC bankers] violated every goddamn law in the book. They took every imaginable form of illegal and illicit business.” Of course HSBC bankers were not the only bankers convicted of laundering huge sums of illicit money and profiting from this illegal act. Wachovia bankers, Standard Chartered bankers, Citibank bankers, Wells Fargo bankers, and dozens of other bankers were also found guilty of these criminal activities as well, exposing the systemic criminal nature of the banking industry.

Consequently, when bankers now claim that their war on cash is a war on corruption, this statement is not only laughably pathetic, it is obscenely hypocritical. If the banking industry were truly sincere in fighting a real war on corruption and had any integrity in this effort, they would have to first turn the spotlight on themselves and dissolve most of the largest global banks within their own network.

In any event, if you’ve been following our blog, most of you already know that banker puppet and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi already unexpectedly banned the two largest rupee notes on 8 November 2016, immediately throwing the Indian economy into chaos. Again, though Modi falsely positioned his war on cash as a “war on corruption”, we explained in this vlog why Modi’s position is patently a lie, and not even a well-disguised lie at that.

Even former Indian PM Manmohan Singh saw easily through Modi’s collaboration with global bankers and Modi’s transparent ruse for what it really was – a declared war on basic human rights and the freedom of Indian citizens. Mr. Singh delivered a scathing condemnation of Modi’s actions: “The vast majority of Indians earn in cash, transact in cash and save in cash, all legitimately. Their daily subsistence depends on their cash being accepted as a medium of valid currency…They save their money in cash which, as it grows, is stored in denominations of 500 rupee and 1000 rupee notes. To tarnish these [notes] as ‘black money’ and throw the lives of these hundreds of millions of poor people in disarray is a mammoth tragedy…It is the fundamental duty of a democratically elected government in any sovereign nation to protect the rights and livelihood of its citizens. The recent decision by the Prime Minister is a travesty of this fundamental duty.” The searing tone of Mr. Sing’s condemnation of Modi’s actions is not only all too evident but it is also well justified.

In addition, as we have written for years, most global banks have been committing acts of massive accounting fraud, and have refused to reveal their true, weak financial conditions in their quarterly and annual reports through various Enron-worthy accounting deceptions ranging from constantly changing their reporting parameters and using fake internal valuation models, instead of a real mark-to-market model, to value their assets. If mass media were really interested in ridding news of “fake news” then they would cease reporting these banker plays all over the world as a “war on corruption” and reveal it as an illegal forced re-capitalization of banks that lack cash. As a quick aside, it is truly ironic that one of the sources for popularizing the term “fake news”, Washington Post journalists, now want this term banned after the use of the term has clearly backfired on the mass media, similar to the time when bankers changed their message about the use of cash being responsible for enduring global poverty, once this sophomoric, fake message backfired on them.

It would be easy to prove this above accusation that many global banks have very little liquidity simply by asking everyone to pick a day and to withdraw 50% of the cash in your deposit/checking accounts on the same day from that bank. If this were to occur, most global banks would likely run out of money before even 5% to 10% of cash was withdrawn. Luckily, for the bankers, this can never be tested, as bankers, well aware of their accounting fraud committed for years and their liquidity problems, have severely restricted daily cash withdrawal limits from the bank, making the above experiment impossible to execute. Bankers around the world have crushed daily cash withdrawal limitations to such low levels, that in many countries, millionaires would literally have to spend years withdrawing their own money, even were they to withdraw the daily cash limit every single day of every single year. In fact, one of the primary reason bankers are so keen on banning cash worldwide is to prevent the discovery that many global banks are indeed bankrupt. When bankers conduct pre-emptive strikes by restricting daily limits of cash withdrawals, and then eventually banning cash outright, this solves the threat of bank runs from ever occurring. The efforts of bankers worldwide to ban cash is just another pre-emptive strike against us.

Antonio Maria Costa, head of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, stated that in the latter half of 2008, that cash proceeds of organized crime were “the only liquid investment capital” available to some banks struggling with liquidity problems and that consequently, bankers eagerly welcomed criminal money into their institutions and laundered the vast majority of the $352B of drugs profits that year. Costa explained, “In many instances, the money from drugs was the only liquid investment capital. In the second half of 2008, liquidity was the banking system’s main problem and hence, liquid capital became an important factor.” My questions to the bankers are the following: “Where was your war against corruption in 2008 if stymieing corruption is so important to you? And, Do you only fight wars on corruption, when you can hide the true motives of your war and when it benefits you?”

In Venezuala, President Maduro eliminated the 100 bolivar note, again citing a war on “corruption” as his motivation for doing so. Maduro further ordered State police in Venezeula to treat every single person in possession of large amounts of 100 bolivar notes as criminals and to assume guilt before innocence in his mandate that every such person should be stopped and investigated. In Venezuela, the pre-crime division of Stephen Spielberg’s Minority Report has already arrived. In reviewing Maduro’s draconian measures, enforced after Venezuelan bankers crushed people’s freedom and their hard-earned life savings by devilishly hyperinflating the bolivar, Spanish economist Willian Ruiz declared, “Any Venezuelan who keeps those notes for any reason, will lose his money, his work, and will be stuck holding worthless paper.” So we must ask ourselves, Are we suffering a war on cash, or a war of bankers against the freedoms of people?

Clearly, bankers are leading a charge across the world not only to institute a 100% digital money world as I predicted 4 ½ years ago, but also to absurdly criminalize the possession of large monetary notes as well. If you believe this type of banker-imposed tyranny is limited to developing nations like India and Venezeula, the call for banning large notes in larger, more-developed countries with much larger economies, as is the case in Australia, may shock you. Leading the charge to “ban corruption” and the A$100 note in Australia is, drumroll, please…unsurprisingly a financial industry executive, former KPMG global chairman Michael Andrew. As “proof” of the massive black money market in Australia, Financial Services Minister Kelly O’ Dwyer stated that three times as many $100 notes exist in circulation as $5 notes, dismissing the simple explanation that perhaps the majority of $100 notes in circulation are legitimate, as people may simply find it more convenient to carry three $100 notes in their wallet as opposed to sixty $5 notes.

And though Australia has not yet banned its large notes, as has India and Venezuela, now that the proposition has been tabled for serious discussion, expect bankers to start issuing more and more frequent press releases in the following countries to condition citizens all over the world into that possession of large cash notes equates to criminality. However, with the resistance of good people all around the world such as yourself, who actively spread articles like this to friends and neighbors, we can fight back by keeping one another informed, well-read, and educated about these brewing very serious issues. Ironically, by informing each other, we may actually be able to provide blowback to the bankers in their war against us. They wish to ban the use of cash worldwide, and to this I say, good riddance because bankers always inflated fiat currencies to steal our savings as we slept. No one should want to use fiat currencies as “money” today anyway. So perhaps we can help bankers to usher in a ban on THEIR currency by converting THEIR currency into OUR currency – physical gold and physical silver!

Next in line after India, Venezuela and Australia for policy discussions of banning large currency notes are Canada, New Zealand, England, Scotland, Ireland, Argentina, Brazil, Spain, Switzerland, Italy and France, Japan and the United States, not necessarily in that order, but this banker movement will be pushed more aggressively in small economies first before spreading to larger economies. If you live in any of these countries and have seen media releases regarding the potential ban of large cash notes in your country, please email us links to this information at info-at-smartknowledgeu-dot-com so that we may keep every subscriber of this blog/newsletter informed of such developments in future articles.

It is only a matter of time before the bankers’ war on all of us takes a leap into its next stage of execution. The time to stand up against such tyranny, as elegantly expressed by former Indian PM Manmohan Singh, has never been any more urgent at any other time in history as right now.

https://www.smartknowledgeu.com/index.php

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"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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ConSigCor
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Check this out.

Why Central Banks Were Forced To Rig The Gold Market

by SRSrocco February 28, 2017

According to newly uncovered information in the gold market, it provides additional evidence of why the Fed, Central Banks and the IMF were forced to RIG the gold market.

https://srsroccoreport.com/new-uncovered-information-why-central-banks-were-forced-to-rig-the-gold-market/

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"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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ConSigCor
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The War on Cash Finds Its General

03/08/2017David Gordon

The Curse of Cash
Kenneth S. Rogoff
Princeton University Press, 2016

Kenneth Rogoff would sharply disagree with Peale, a character in the 1915 novel It Pays to Advertise, who said that the most beautiful word in the English language is “cash.” For Rogoff, a distinguished monetary economist (and chess grandmaster) who teaches at Harvard, cash, especially in large denominations, ought to be eliminated.

Rogoff has two main arguments for his proposal; but, before examining them, let us look at exactly what he wishes to do. In his suggested plan, which “can be adapted and tweaked in many directions,” “All paper currency is gradually phased out, beginning with all notes of $50 and above (or foreign equivalent), then next the $20 bill, leaving only $1, $5, and (perhaps) $10 bills. ... The government provides all individuals the option of access to free basic-function debit card/smartphone accounts, either through banks or through a government option. ... Regulatory and legal framework aims to discourage other means of making large-scale payments that can be completely hidden from the government. ... Government helps facilitate ... real-time clearing for most transactions.”

One word reverberates throughout this proposal: “government.” For Rogoff, the government must combat nefarious characters in the “underground economy,” not to mention tax cheats, who transact business in paper money. Think of all the revenue the government has lost, owing to the selfishness of these miscreants!

The problems posed by the underground economy, Rogoff tells us, are far-reaching in scope: there is a great deal of “missing” cash, mostly in large denominations. “The bulk of US cash in circulation cannot be accounted for by consumer surveys. Obviously, if consumers are holding only a small fraction of all cash outstanding, they cannot possibly be holding more than a small fraction of the $100 bills in circulation, since $100 bills account for nearly 80 percent of the value of US currency.”

Where are the missing $100 bills? Much of it is used in illegal activities, like the drug trade. “The drug trade is a famously cash-intensive business at every level. ... The RAND Corporation has estimated the combined size of the market for four major illegal drugs in the United States to be more than $100 billion in 2010. ... Eliminating cash would hardly eliminate drug cartels. Nevertheless, it would be a significant blow to their business model at many levels.”

But could we not instead deal with this problem by ending the drug war? In a legal market, could the drug cartels survive? Rogoff has in part anticipated this response, but he rejects it summarily. “Obviously there are other ways of reducing drug-related crime. A simple one would be to legalize marijuana ... [but] hard drugs would remain problematic.” The thought that the drug war should be ended entirely has not entered his head.

He might reply in this way: “Even if you crazed libertarians would make all drugs legal, you still have to acknowledge that some activities that should be illegal, like human trafficking, depend on dealing in cash. This fact by itself suffices to justify my proposal.”

And this is not all that concerns Rogoff. Cash transactions enable people to avoid paying taxes. “The largest holdings and use of cash in the domestic underground economy likely derive from residents of all types ... who are broadly engaged in legal activities but who are avoiding taxes, regulations, or employment restrictions ... the tax gap is sufficiently huge that if eliminating cash can close it by as little as, say, 10 percent, the revenue gains would be quite substantial ... the gains would be on the order of $50 billion from federal taxes alone and perhaps another $20 billion for state and local taxes.” Rogoff recognizes that many people do not want tax regulations to be “rigidly enforced” but responds that tax evasion creates a “horizontal equity” problem: if you evade your taxes, others, who do not, will have to pay more. But once again, the libertarian response does not occur to him: taxes are unjust exactions that violate people’s rights.

Suppose, though, that one grants to Rogoff that taxes are legitimate and also that ready access to cash makes some crimes much easier to commit. Has he made his case for the abolition of cash? As he recognizes, the advantages of his proposal must be balanced against concerns about privacy: “It is important to separate out protection from government snooping and protection from relatives, friends, employers, or other private entities. Of course, people will always want to keep some expenditures or income secret from spouses, parents, and friends. The government can perfectly allow such transactions as long as they do not entail recurrent large expenditures and income to be completely hidden from the government.”

Incredibly, he fails to realize that many of us do not want the government to monitor what we are doing. As long as our neighbors cannot snoop on us, everything is fine. Where liberty is concerned, Rogoff just does not “get it.” He points that a critic of his proposals quoted against him Dostoevsky’s remark, “Money is coined liberty,” but notes that the remark in The House of the Dead describes life in prison. “To draw an analogy between life in a Tsarist prison and life in the modern liberal state as a defense of large-denomination notes borders on the absurd.” The modern liberal state is your friend; why worry?

What we have discussed so far is only Rogoff ’s first argument for the abolition of cash: he has another as well. If the economy is in a recession, the monetary authorities may need to “turbocharge” the economy by pushing interest rates down. Doing so, they hope, will stimulate production and increase aggregate demand. But at present an obstacle blocks these plans. The money rate of interest has already fallen to zero. Further reductions require negative rates. But if these are imposed, depositors will withdraw their funds. Why keep money in the bank if part of your money will be confiscated?

Rogoff describes the problem of the “zero bound constraint” in this way: “paper currency can be thought of as a zero-interest-rate bond. ... As long as people have the choice of paper money, they are not going to be willing to accept an interest rate that is significantly lower on any kind of bond ... the zero bound has essentially crippled monetary policy across the advanced world for much of the past 8 years since the financial crash of 2008. If unconstrained negative rate policy was possible ... central banks would never ‘run out of bullets’ (i.e., room to keep cutting interest rates)” (p. 5).

If paper money is eliminated, depositors will no longer be able to withdraw their money. What could be simpler?

It is disappointing that Rogoff fails to mention Austrian arguments that stimulating aggregate demand through monetary expansion is not the appropriate response to recession. He has read Rothbard and cites him on paper money in the colonial period (p. 235, note 26). But the Austrian theory of the business cycle is not
within his range of vision.

He does, though, address an argument by Milton Friedman that is highly relevant to stabilization policy. “Friedman perfectly well understood that monetary policy could be a potent tool for economic stabilization, but he argued that central banks were so incompetent and so prone to inflationary finance that life would be simpler and better if the whole concept of Keynesian activist monetary policy was simply forgotten” (p. 188).

He replies that Friedman’s alternative of limited monetary expansion according to a fixed rule has not worked. Friedman thought that there was a fixed relationship between the quantity of money and prices, but this has not always proved to be the case. Rogoff may be right, but he has not responded to Freidman’s argument against central bank discretion. The fact, if it is one, that a particular alternative to discretionary policy fails is irrelevant. If someone argues that policy A will fail, claiming that alternative B is no better is hardly a response.

Regardless of whether Rogoff ’s way of dealing with the zero bound constraint is economically sound, though, is it not unfair on its face? If you deposit money in a bank, why should it be subject in part to confiscation? Rogoff answers that those who press this objection are victims of a “money illusion”: “Many people will likely regard negative interest rates as a violation of the trust citizens place in their government. ... To see negative nominal interest rates as unholy but moderate inflation as just bad is to suffer what economists call ‘money illusion’ ” (emphasis in original). But why not take this point to be an argument against government-mandated inflation rather than, as Rogoff wishes, a defense of negative interest rates? Rogoff complains of the “zero bound constraint,” but he is himself bound by statist assumptions.

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"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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Breacher
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There has already been a big demand for bills larger than $100, but the feds won't do it, and the world bankers were pulling the 500Euro notes out of circulation starting a while back.

Traditionally, that's the turf of diamonds and gold, but diamonds are fickle market with high margins and ambiguous actual value.

That leaves silver, but it does not have such a great value to weight ratio. Then gold, which gets tricky because counterfeiting is fairly easy compared to the values that people are looking for and there have already been controversies over gold covered tungsten.

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Life liberty, and the pursuit of those who threaten them.

Trump: not the president America needs, but the president America deserves.

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Huskerpatriot
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The thought of fake metals always scares me. There is a great deal of trust in any purchase.

Dishonest scales are an abomination to the Lord, but a just weight is His delight. Proverbs 11:1

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"Government at its best is a necessary evil, and at it’s worst, an intolerable one."
 Thomas Paine (from "Common Sense" 1776)

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Breacher
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I came close to getting scammed on a trade deal a while back involving a 1911 for a bunch of silver coins. The guy had kept slipping some "commemorative" coins into the mix that were not marked as 999 silver. Stuff from the Bahamas and such. Far as I could tell, they were like challenge coins or Franklin mint stuff.

Another time a friend of mine got nailed on some supposedly Chinese 10oz ingots.

My advice, NEVER deal with the poured silver stuff. If it looks poured, then the answer is no, unless you are making your own jewelry and poured art out of it. Under those circumstances, the game is that it can get through checkpoints and customs and isn't declared as currency.

That game is played by the ultra rich with jewelry all the time. That's how my amily escaped Europe right before the war, but the price you pay in the conversion process is a major head trip. I shit you not, a 30% spread on cost to loss on a fast sale is entirely normal. That goes to the whole old world thing of big chunks of family wealth getting wrapped up in a large ornate thing that someone would wear for a painting. Then when the painting is done with the person wearing the piece, the painting is then put on display in a museum somewhere, or a regional capitol. It stands as a permanent record of verification of the wealth of a certain family jewel set. Public events and showings then act as a verification process for the family wealth and security. A family fallen on hard times or using that as security for a loan though, faces the appraisal process which judges them as much as it judges the actual value of the item. Hence the very reasons why someone has the right to be offended at the notion that their gems are "blood diamonds". Meaning that the wealth was gotten in some illegitimate way, or represents illegitimate wealth.

A major bullshit hustle with people dealing precious metals is that someone with government connections comes along and claims your stuff is stolen property, but if you take care of their needs in some way, make the right offer, that suspicion might go away... That's one of the problems you get with bullion, but with custom jewelry, especially if it was also part of an art showing or purchased through public auction or jewelry showings where everyone knows that particular artist and their work, and the social circle of people who had bought or commissioned that work, that's where the non-bullion stuff comes in.

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Life liberty, and the pursuit of those who threaten them.

Trump: not the president America needs, but the president America deserves.

Posts: 6666 | From: Western States | Registered: Sep 2002  | Report this post to a Moderator
ConSigCor
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IMF Plan to Force a Cashless Society On World Unfolding – Here’s How

April 9, 2017

The IMF (International Monetary Fund)…has drawn up plans to force aWays-to-make-money-1 cashless society upon all the people within IMF member nations. In their “The Macroeconomics of De-Cashing” it gives the following advice to governments who want to abolish cash against the will of their citizenry:

Move slowly; phase in the de-cashing in specific uncontested steps which give the impression that measures are based on individual consumer choice and cost-benefits considerations.
Avoid any attempts to impose de-cashing by a decree given the popular personal attachment to cash.
Implement a targeted outreach program to alleviate suspicions related to de-cashing; in particular, that by de-cashing the authorities are trying to control all aspects of peoples’ lives, including their use of money, or push personal savings into banks.

The comments above & below are edited ([ ]) and abridged (…) excerpts from the original article by Rory Hall (TheDailyCoin.org)

In “The Macroeconomics of De-Cashing”, IMF-Analyst Alexei Kireyev recommends in his conclusions:

Although some countries most likely will de-cash in a few years, going completely cashless should be phased-in in steps.

The de-cashing process could build on the initial and largely uncontested steps, such as:
the phasing out of large denomination bills,
the placement of ceilings on cash transactions,
the reporting of cash moves across the borders…
the creating of economic incentives to reduce the use of cash in transactions,
simplifying the opening and use of transferrable deposits,
and further computerizing the financial system.

The private sector led de-cashing seems preferable to the public sector led de-cashing.

the former seems almost entirely benign (e.g., more use of mobile phones to pay for coffee), but still needs policy adaptation.
The latter seems more questionable, and people may have valid objections to it.

De-cashing of either kind leaves both individuals and states more vulnerable to disruptions, ranging from power outages to hacks to cyber warfare.

In any case, the tempting attempts to impose de-cashing by a decree should be avoided, given the popular personal attachment to cash.

A targeted outreach program is needed to alleviate suspicions related to de-cashing; in particular, that by de-cashing the authorities are trying to control all aspects of peoples’ lives, including their use of money, or push personal savings into banks.

The de-cashing process would acquire more traction if it were based on individual consumer choice and cost-benefits considerations. Source

It doesn’t get much clearer than that – if the people resist, simply change the rules and…simply enact a new law that the majority of people will accept and the remaining 3-5% will be forced into enslavement with the rest.

Let’s break it down a little so the picture is as clear as possible.

The de-cashing process could build on the initial and largely uncontested steps, such as:

the phasing out of large denomination bills [like the $100 bill],
the placement of ceilings on cash transactions [to perhaps no larger than $1,000 as most of the European Union countries have already done thus requiring the] use of electronic means or of having a bank involved at some level, e.g. cashier check so their is a record of the transaction for tax and tracking purposes,
making it almost impossible to get cash out of your country and into another by requiring the reporting of cash moves across the borders. In the U.S., for example, you are required to declare more than $10,000 cash moving across the border and my guess is this [could] suffer a substantial cut….
and perhaps having, for example, “big-box stores” agree to simply no longer accept cash “for your safety” of course. By implementing this type of policy change the government would not seen as the ‘bad guy’ but, [rather, the retail outlet would be portrayed as]…looking out for its shoppers’ safety and the safety of its employees…

Once these the steps are in place, it makes it much easier to get people to accept financial enslavement as a “convenience” and “for your protection and safety” – “for the children”.

Note, that the author is not talking about unreasonable objections and imagined disadvantages: He does count it among the advantages of de-cashing in the very next paragraph that personal savings are pushed into banks and he also does count total control of all aspects of financial life under the pros, as in the last sentence of the last quote below.

“As de-cashing gives incentives to economies’ agents to convert their currency in bank deposits, the deposit base of the banking system will increase, which can help reduce the lending rates and expand credit.” Source

As the criminal banking cabal becomes more desperate to steal our remaining wealth they are devising more devious ways of doing it. Soft-sell the people into their own enslavement instead of forcing them. The past few decades we have been treated just a step above cattle, now the gloves seem to be coming off and the banking cabal no longer cares that we can see their crimes and their true colors.

http://www.munknee.com/imf-plan-to-force-a-cashless-society-on-world-unfolding-heres-how/

[ 04-12-2017, 04:38 AM: Message edited by: ConSigCor ]

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"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

Posts: 14476 | From: A 059 Btn 16 FF MSC | Registered: Oct 2001  | Report this post to a Moderator
Breacher
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De-cashing also would go with the agenda 21 in that lack of communications coverage in remote areas kills the economy of those areas. Thus if you can't do transactions "out there" then you are going to be living in primitive poverty.

I have been watching a bunch of thenbritush documentaries on Amazon recently, and while they are mainly a bunch of snotty social critics, they do cover some stuff from perspectives they probably don't even realize. For example, the way natives get treated in some of those Amazon rain forests is exactly the plan the international corporate types have been doing to rednecks in the south and Cowboys in the American west.

All these Brits hating on the central banks and debt situations are missing the mark but their problem is unique to developed areas. Specifically high end developed areas because the young there cannot saddle the costs of a winner take all economy. They will demand socialism because foreign buyers take the housing market.

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Life liberty, and the pursuit of those who threaten them.

Trump: not the president America needs, but the president America deserves.

Posts: 6666 | From: Western States | Registered: Sep 2002  | Report this post to a Moderator
Breacher
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I don't like Bitcoin, but I decided to try it and am stumbling through the protocols on setting up the account right now.

If I am not mistaken, this block chain if that's what they call it, can receive money

18G869EkgbQJntkFq47Xu3xvU4L568AiiR

I think it might be a one time code.

What I already dislike is the way these things require a lot of personal information to actually make purchases in a non-cash manner. You can shift money into and out of anonymous accounts, but try spending it on stuff and they can easily figure out exactly who you are.

As soon as I get money in the account, I'll try sending it to someone. If I haven't forgotten all of the associated passwords already...

[ 04-22-2017, 03:44 PM: Message edited by: Breacher ]

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Life liberty, and the pursuit of those who threaten them.

Trump: not the president America needs, but the president America deserves.

Posts: 6666 | From: Western States | Registered: Sep 2002  | Report this post to a Moderator
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