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Author Topic: American Health Care Act
airforce
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Here is the 123-page text of the ObamaCare Lite.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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It looks like the Republicans are planning to cram this through Congress before the Congressional Budget Office has a chance to score it. That means NO ONE will have any idea just how much this plan will cost, even as they're debating it.

Four GOP (in name, at least) senators say they will oppose any rollback of the Medicaid expansion. So this thing may well be dead in the water anyway.

Onward and upward,
airforce

[ 03-06-2017, 09:57 PM: Message edited by: airforce ]

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Huskerpatriot
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I see the RINOs as an equal threat as the liberals... They stand for nothing and are more than happy to compromise on our liberty if it will get be them more power!

--------------------
"Government at its best is a necessary evil, and at it’s worst, an intolerable one."
 Thomas Paine (from "Common Sense" 1776)

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airforce
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There is one number that will doom any government health care plan. What is the number? 87.

87 percent of Americans favor "maintaining the protections offered to people with pre-existing conditions under Obamacare." And that's a problem.

Suppose we sold auto insurance that way. No one would buy auto insurance until they had an accident. Can you see the problem?

Americans have forgotten what "insurance" really is. It's a way to protect yourself from a possible problem you don't have now, but may have in the future. If you don't have a problem now, but can always buy insurance in the future when you do have a problem, why would anyone buy insurance now?

Traditionally, insurance companies didn't have this problem. They were under no obligation to sell insurance to someone who was sick, and if they did, they certainly wouldn't sell it at the same price.

The new insurance plan does do away with mandates for individuals and companies to buy insurance, but it keeps the mandate for insurance companies to sell insurance to those with pre-existing conditions.

Selling insurance to sick people is certainly the compassionate thing to do, I understand that. But if it forces insurance companies to get out of the medical insurance market, the whole plan is doomed from the start.

I'm sure the Republicans who drafted this plan understand this, but they don't care. They want to get re-elected, and if that means passing a billthat can't work, well, so be it.

And people wonder why I'm a free market anarchist. [Roll Eyes]

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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From Pastor Chuck Baldwin:

quote:
Neocon House Speaker Paul Ryan and the GOP congressional leadership are promoting "Obamacare Lite," which keeps and even strengthens most of Obamacare. It even features guaranteed bailouts for insurance companies and permanently ensconces socialized medicine in America.

Senator Rand Paul and other conservative senators and House members are strongly opposing the bill. Kudos to them!!! Right now, at least 70 Republicans are vowing to vote against it.

But get this: President Donald Trump is pressuring congressional conservatives to surrender their principles and support this grotesque legislation. I hate to say it, but by doing this Trump is acting just like previous Neocon Republican presidents.

Really, Mr. Trump? You are going to support phony conservatives such as Paul Ryan and turn your back on conservative members of Congress? Have you forgotten that repealing Obamacare was one of the main reasons conservatives elected you President to begin with? Beyond that, the members of Congress that you are now backing are the same ones who did everything they could to keep you OUT of the White House.

Is this a precursor of things to come? If so, Democrats won't have to put up with Mr. Trump for very long, because he will be a one-term President for sure.

Republicans control the entire federal government right now: the White House and both houses of Congress. They could pass a complete repeal of Obamacare; and then replace it with...NOTHING. If they wanted to, that is. But the truth is, the Republican Party is nothing but Democrat Lite, which is why nothing much changes no matter which party is in control in Washington, D.C.

Let's see how many "conservative" and "patriot" radio talk show hosts, web hosts, magazine publishers and editors, etc., will try to justify this stupid thing because it's Trump and the Republicans that are proposing it. This has been going on FOREVER.

It is stuff like this that makes the GOP so stinking dangerous. "It can't get any worse than the Democrats." Just keep telling yourself that--and looking the other way, of course.

Better yet, call a piece of crap a piece of crap (regardless of who is shoveling it) and let your congressman and senators know how disappointed and opposed you are to Ryan's sellout.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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Here is a sample letter you can send to your congressman if you like Rand Paul's plan better.

quote:
The official GOP Obamacare replacement proposal is a fraud. Senator Rand Paul’s bill is far better. The Paul bill should become the official GOP Obamacare replacement legislation. Feel free to copy or edit this letter as you wish.

The Republican leadership’s proposal repeals far less of Obamacare than did previous GOP repeal bills. It’s infuriating that Republican leaders are once again betraying their promises at the very moment when they actually have the power to do something. This bad Republican proposal actually retains Obamacare’s...

-- Insurance price fixing provisions
-- Tax penalties for people who don’t purchase state-approved insurance plans
-- Tax funded subsidies to help low-income people purchase overpriced health insurance.

GOP leaders also create new matching grants to states to fund features of Obamacare they once campaigned against, such as...

-- Insurance company bailouts
-- High-risk pools
-- Expanded funding for support programs akin to Medicaid, but without that name

Cato Institute even argues that, “The funding formula for this new grant program appears to reward high-cost states.” In other words, the more expensive a state’s healthcare becomes, the more money that state will get. This is a recipe for sending costs higher and higher.

Perhaps the only redeeming feature of the official Republican proposal is that it cuts all sorts of silly, social engineering taxes. But it counteracts this good by retaining the “Cadillac Tax” on high-end employer-provided health insurance. The correct approach is to make all forms of health insurance equally tax deductible. But...

Even here, the Republican plan is fraudulent.It retains the “Cadillac Tax” until 2025. You might as well say, it's here forever.

Worst of all, the official Republican plan does nothing to restore free market healthcare. Senator Paul’s "Obamacare Replacement Act" (S. 222) does a much better job of this.

Rand Paul’s plan would...

* Provide a two-year buffer period in which people with pre-existing conditions (PEC) could still get coverage. That would allow time for the market to solve the PEC problem in other ways (as described below).

* Make the cost of individual insurance tax deductible. This would give individual policies the same tax treatment as employer-provided policies. Most likely, the number of individually owned policies would expand. With more people owning their own policy, the PEC problem would plummet. PEC is a politician-created problem that happens when people get sick after losing their job (and therefore their insurance).

* Give citizens a tax credit of up to $5,000 for contributions to an HSA (Health Savings Account)

* Eliminate the ceiling on HSA contributions

* Remove the stipulation that you must have a high-deductible health care plan in order to have an HSA

* Allow citizens to use HSA funds for insurance premiums

* Expand the number of things HSA funds could be used for, including over-the-counter drugs, vitamins and supplements, plus nutrition and exercise programs. One of the great flaws of Obamacare is that it does nothing to lower the burden on the medical system by preserving health and preventing disease. Healthier people don't need as much medical care.

* Allow citizens to band together to lower the cost of buying insurance. Individual Health Pools (IHPs) would give persons the same bargaining power that employer insurance groups currently have. The IHPs could include churches, alumni associations, trade associations, civic groups, or entities formed strictly for establishing an IHP, as long as there is no health status requirement for membership. This provision would dramatically reduce the PEC problem.

* Allow physicians to band together to gain bargaining power with insurers, without having to concentrate into big impersonal medical firms.

* Allow doctors to deduct the expense of the uncompensated care they provide, thereby making pro bono services, free clinics, and true charity hospitals more plentiful.

* Allow insurance providers to sell policies nationally. This would remove the cartel control that the insurance industry currently maintains through state legislatures. This would also restore the market for major medical plans, which is how insurance is supposed to work. The result would be a wider variety of policy choices at much lower prices.

* Give states flexibility in how they design and manage their Medicaid programs. This would enable experimentation and competition between the 50 states. It would also allow the states to innovate new ways to address the PEC problem.

* Repeal Obamacare at the same time it replaces it.

In short, I think Rand Paul’s bill should become the official Republican bill. Do it.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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TrumpCare proponents are sinking to a new low, attacking GOP congressmen who oppose this boondoggle. I just saw a commercial (on the local Fox News channel) telling people to urge my congressman, Jim Bridenstine, a member of the House Freedom Caucus, to get behind Ryan's plan. The ad implied that those who oppose don't want to repeal ObamaCare.

I just emailed Rep. Bridenstine, asking him to hold firm. If you're congressman is being attacked like this, I urge you to do the same. We shouldn't have to put up with these lies.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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From Rep. Thomas Massie:

quote:
President Trump spoke to us this morning in a private GOP meeting. He's considerably more charming and intelligent than the media would lead you to believe. I'm still voting No on Obamacare-lite this Thursday.

I was elected not to follow the DC crowd but to come here and make good decisions for my constituents while being fiscally responsible and defending our constitution. I support our President but in my judgement he's receiving bad advice on the negative consequences of this legislation with respect to the cost of health care. Furthermore, he's been mislead about the political implications of this bill and even the likelihood of its passage Thursday.

To that point, on average, I'm receiving 30 calls a day from constituents opposing this bill, and ZERO supporting it. If you support this bill, and you live in Kentucky's fourth congressional district, please feel free to call me or comment below.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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Why not a Netflix for doctors? Some people - not enough people, alas - are talking about actual, free market solutions to health care.

quote:
To its critics, Republicans’ Obamacare replacement bill is not just a bad idea, it seems to reveal a dearth of ideas. The impression among some liberals (and even conservatives) is that, given seven years to come up with an alternative to Obamacare, the best the GOP could do was to water down the Affordable Care Act and throw in some personal-responsibility measures for flair.

But in fact, some hardcore conservatives do have pretty radical health-care ideas—they’re just not anything like the American Health Care Act. Over the course of several recent interviews, the Heritage Foundation’s Ed Haislmaier shared his vision for a fully market-based health system, in which people subscribe to their doctors like they would Netflix and low-performing general hospitals get crushed by scrappy, stand-alone specialty practices. Access to doctors and treatments would hinge on whatever the “the market” deemed best, with consumers the kingmakers.

His ideas probably won’t resonate with those who fear that vulnerable populations will slip through the cracks, but they are a stark departure from the typical Republican talking points on health care—like, say, selling insurance across state lines.

Haislmaier, the foundation’s senior research fellow for health policy, is influential in Republican circles: He worked on the Trump administration’s transition team, primarily on ways to stabilize the Obamacare marketplaces. He’s now back at Heritage full time. Like Heritage Action, the think-tank’s political arm, Haislmaier doesn’t like the AHCA, saying it doesn’t “undo a lot of what’s really wrong with the Affordable Care Act.” Most of his ideas would rise from the ashes of a long-gone ACA, or be rolled out gradually by enterprising states and cities.

First, Haislmaier and others at Heritage told me they’d like to see an end to certificate of need laws, which require health practices to get permission from a state board before setting up shop. Then, there could be an influx of, say, free-standing radiology practices that move in and compete with the radiology services a hospital provides.

“How many hospitals have you seen go under?” Haislmaier asked me.

“I mean, there’s been quite a few,” I said.

“Not enough,” he said. “Not the ones that need to.”

His point is that hospitals today resemble department stores like Macy’s: “It’s a bit of everything for everybody, but they don't do any one thing really well.”

He sees them being replaced by independent specialists—think Sur La Table and Foot Locker, except with orthopedic surgeons. Not only would these practices compete against each other, they would, theoretically, be free of the need to subsidize an expensive emergency room and other trappings of a hospital....

Read the whole thing at the link.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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Count Sen. Mike Lee out, too.

 -

And Rand Paul says there are easily 35 "No" votes in the House.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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How the government ruined healthcare, and what we can do about it. A new article from the Mises Institute.

quote:
Government’s meddling in the healthcare business has been disastrous from the get-go.

Since 1910, when Republican William Taft gave in to the American Medical Association’s lobbying efforts, most administrations have passed new healthcare regulations. With each new law or set of new regulations, restrictions on the healthcare market went further, until at some point in the 1980s, people began to notice the cost of healthcare had skyrocketed.

This is not an accident. It’s by design.

As regulators allowed special interests to help design policy, everything from medical education to drugs became dominated by virtual monopolies that wouldn’t have otherwise existed if not for government’s notion that intervening in people’s lives is part of their job.

But how did costs go up, and why didn’t this happen overnight?

It wasn’t until 1972 that President Richard Nixon restricted the supply of hospitals by requiring institutions to provide a certificate-of-need.

Just a couple years later, in 1974, the president also strengthened unions for hospital workers by boosting pension protections, which raise the cost for both those who run hospitals and taxpayers in cases of institutions that rely on government subsidies. This move also helped force doctors who once owned and ran their own hospitals to merge into provider monopolies. These, in turn, are often only able to keep their doors open with the help of government subsidies.


This artificial restriction on healthcare access had yet another harsh consequence: overworked doctors.

But they weren’t the first to feel the consequences hit home. As the number of hospitals and clinics became further restricted and the healthcare industry became obsessed with simple compliance, patients were the first to feel abandoned.

According to Business Insider, the average doctor has thousands of patients, and each visit lasts less than 30 minutes. Prior to the government’s slow but absolute control of healthcare, the doctor listened to the patient — many old timers will confirm — even if they couldn’t afford it. Few were turned down. Now, doctors can hardly recall the conversations they have with the people they are supposed to be looking after.

As President Barack Obama pushed further restrictions on the insurance industry by touting his Affordable Care Act as a piece of legislation that would make insurance more affordable — ignoring that insurance isn’t the same as care — the overall cost of coverage also increased over the years. And as a result, a new group of independent healthcare professionals went on to ignite one of the most liberating revolutions in recent US history.

Business Insider chronicles the story behind Dr. Bryan Hill’s practice.

As a pediatrician, Hill spent most of his life dealing with insurance companies. But one day after answering an impromptu house call, he decided he had had enough.

That’s when he learned about primary care clinics. These offices remain open by giving patients memberships in exchange for a monthly fee that covers most of what the average patient requires. As a result, the patient pays the doctor directly, and neither party is forced to navigate the complicated rules imposed by insurance companies.

In September 2016, Hill opened his practice in South Carolina, and he’s not planning on going back. But he’s just one of many. As ACA became increasingly suffocating to patients and providers, many doctors ditched the system altogether while others went into the primary care business.

On average, members of these direct primary care clinics pay as little as $60 per month, with couples paying about $150. Without having to handle heavily regulated middlemen, patients have a clearer picture of how much they spend on their health by being members of such practices. They also enjoy the peace of mind of knowing their doctor.

Studies have already demonstrated that when there is good communication between doctors and patients, treatments are more efficient. This is not simply because doctors are giving patients attention, but also because they are able to tailor a certain treatment to that patient’s lifestyle, health, and activities.

By removing the government entirely from the picture and allowing patients and doctors to once again deal directly with one another, the practice of embracing primary care helps to illustrate the importance of an individual and personalized approach to healthcare.

For governments and government bureaucrats, everything is dealt with from a collective perspective — after all, if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

When government gets involved in healthcare, everything looks like another number, another statistic. But what bureaucrats fail to understand is that they do not possess all the answers. Only a doctor who is paying attention will be better able to help the individual patient — not a few thousand new regulations.

In essence, what this growing movement seems to suggest is that, even if doctors and patients are unaware of the interventionist forces driving the cost of doing business and receiving medical attention, they’re still driven into the open arms of the free market at some point or another. In the end, needs speak louder than ideology.

That is how my doctor now works. I like it.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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The GOP doctored the bill a little bit overnight, trying to make it more palatable. They did remove some of the mandates, but they left in place the rules on preexisting conditions.

And, it pretty much guaranteed the Republicans will be voting on a bill they haven't read. Sound familiar?

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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Paul Ryan has cancelled today's vote on the bill. Clearly the GOP doesn't have the votes to pass it. Good.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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Is Trump playing chicken with the Freedom Caucus on ObamaCare? If he is, it may backfire, because Rep. Thomas Massie isn't being intimidated.

This could get ugly.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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It looks like Trump blinked. Speaker Ryan cancelled today's vote on the bill.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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I just heard that Trump is going to try to get some Democrats to support the bill. "The Art of the Deal" indeed.

UPDATE: Apparently not. The bill looks dead, and deservedly so.

Onward and upward,
airforce

[ 03-24-2017, 02:16 PM: Message edited by: airforce ]

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ConSigCor
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Everyone should take the time to give this a listen. It explains why healthcare will NEVER be fixed. Pay particular attention to what happened to this doctor when he "bucked" the system.


Government & Healthcare - No Money in Prevention! - With Dr. David Janda

Dr. Janda joins John B Wells - breaking down ObamaCare, comparing it to HillaryCare from 1992-93, he details how closely the two resemble each other and how we ended up where we are today.

https://youtu.be/xVV_lL-VOHM

[ 03-25-2017, 08:03 AM: Message edited by: ConSigCor ]

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"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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airforce
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Inside the TrumpCare meltdown:

quote:
When the balky hardliners of the House Freedom Caucus visited the White House earlier this week, this was Steve Bannon's opening line, according to people in the conference room in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building:

quote:
Guys, look. This is not a discussion. This is not a debate. You have no choice but to vote for this bill.
Bannon's point was: This is the Republican platform. You're the conservative wing of the Republican Party. But people in the room were put off by the dictatorial mindset.

One of the members replied: "You know, the last time someone ordered me to something, I was 18 years old. And it was my daddy. And I didn't listen to him, either."

Started on the wrong foot: Repeal-and-replace was always snakebit. Ryan had begun the process before Trump's inauguration. "He boxed us in," said one person close to the fight. "We didn't have any choice."

Was always wobbly: Trump relied too long on assurances from Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and HHS Secretary Tom Price that they had the process in hand. And "Ryan was telling him it was fine, and they'd bring it together at the end." Instead, the bottom fell out....

What a freakin' mess. Read the whole thing at the link.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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ConSigCor
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Did you listen to the podcast I posted?

--------------------
"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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airforce
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About half of it, I'll get the other half tomorrow. For what it's worth, my own doctor doesn't take any insurance at all. She charges a flat $100 a month for unlimited office visits, and free or reduced prices on other procedures or tests. There is still a free market for health care, but you have to look hard to find it.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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ConSigCor
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The entire interview was good but the last half is probably the best part.

BTW. John B is on every Sat night at 10 central on KLIF 570 out of TX. You ought to be able to hear him no problem.

[ 03-25-2017, 06:00 PM: Message edited by: ConSigCor ]

--------------------
"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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airforce
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He's also a regular on "Coast to Coast" on weekends when George Noory is off.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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ConSigCor
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He used to be until they told him to tone it down. Now he's strictly his own show. Daily podcasts and the broadcast on AM Sat.

--------------------
"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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Breacher
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If they want to give my guns back, I'll give my loyalty back, officially, but until then fuck them.

Another friend of mine just got diagnosed with cancer. Fortunately he has some health coverage through his wife's employer but it's going to be rough. If it wasn't for a bunch of selfish turds up in Washington, my cannabis oil extract situation would be happily up and running.

--------------------
Life liberty, and the pursuit of those who threaten them.

Trump: not the president America needs, but the president America deserves.

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airforce
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Sen. Rand Paul declares victory.

quote:
Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) quickly declared victory on Friday, praising conservatives for "standing up against ObamaCare Lite."

“I applaud House conservatives for keeping their word to the American people,” Paul said in a statement.

Republican leaders pulled their bill to repeal and replace ObamaCare on Friday afternoon, acknowledging that it was headed toward defeat.

Paul — who has been a top antagonist of the House bill — added that "I look forward to passing full repeal of ObamaCare in the very near future.”

Paul and other House conservatives have offered an alternative repeal bill that mirrors 2015 legislation cleared by Congress but vetoed by then-President Barack Obama.

The bill would effectively separate repeal and replace into two separate pieces of legislation, a move that would likely draw pushback from a coalition of moderate lawmakers....

Onward and upward,
airforce

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Breacher
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A few less cruise missiles would pay for a lot more government clinics. Just sayin...

--------------------
Life liberty, and the pursuit of those who threaten them.

Trump: not the president America needs, but the president America deserves.

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airforce
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The government doesn't pay for mechanics to fix your car, and mechanics are affordable. If the government got out of health care, doctors would be affordable too.

I found an example of this a while back. I needed a CAT scan, so I went to the imaging place about a block from my doctor. They told me if I used Medicare, it would be a small deductible for me and they would bill the insurance company $1400. I asked how much it would cost if I paid the whole thing in cash, up front.

I paid them $150, and got my CAT scan. That's just a little more than I would pay for a tune-up and oil change these days.

Onward and upward,
airforce

[ 03-26-2017, 12:03 PM: Message edited by: airforce ]

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The Answer
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The problems with health care include at least:

1. The system is designed around health care being attached to employment

2. The whole point of insurance is that it's unlikely you'll need it. No one will sell you car insurance to pay for your repairs AFTER the accident. No one will sell you flood insurance AFTER the flood.

3. None of the prices are correct signals correlating supply with demand. Prices are meaningless. What does the patient pay? what does the insurance co. pay? What is the sticker price? these are all meaningless because of how the bills are actually paid

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airforce
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I'll add one more, since I'm pretty sure the FDA is responsible for more deaths than all other government agencies combined. Rules and regulations placed on pharmaceutical companies by the government and the FDA vastly inflates the cost of healthcare.

I read the other day about a doctor treating a young woman with sepsis. The woman was near death, and there are no drugs that would effectively treat her condition. The doctor did read somewhere that vitamin C could help treat it and, with no other options left, he ordered vitamin C be given through an IV.

In 24 hours, her condition had improved markedly, and four days later she was out of the ICU.

Other things could have caused her condition to improve, so it's impossible to say if the vitamin C was responsible. The only way to determine that is through a comprehensive - and incredibly expensive - series of tests, which can only be funded by pharmaceutical companies.

But vitamin C is a common and cheap drug, and there is little incentive for any pharmaceutical company to pony up the money for testing. Thanks to the FDA, we may never know if vitamin C is effective or not.

That, and the fact that the American Medical Association is an incredibly effective trade union (and you know how I feel about trade unions!), makes a free market in health care unaffordable for most people.

UPDATE: I finally found that news article.

Onward and upward,
airforce

[ 03-26-2017, 08:43 PM: Message edited by: airforce ]

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fal3
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There are a number of reasons that TrumpCare, or the American HealthCare, will fail, even if it is tweaked to give the maximum advantage to patients:

1. The Pharmaceutical Companies. They have always been driven by greed. Laws which give them more latitude to wheel and deal will not result in lower of prices. Greed always outweighs compassion.

2. The medical profession. Medical professions have been schooled in business more than the medical sciences. Few doctors opening a new practice will actually care about the health of a patient. He/she has been schooled on how to make the greatest amount of money in the shortest amount of time.

Under a new healthcare plan, will they begin to care about financially-limited patients, or will they take them for every cent they can squeeze from their hurting bodies ?

How many would be like the doctor Airforce mentioned who tried VC therapy ? Very, very few.

I agree that ObamaCare is a disaster and must be replaced. But, I am not optimistic about it changing the state of medical care in this country.

I like Trump, and support his basic concepts. But, in many respects, he is naive. The state of medical care in this country will not change until the people at the top change their thinking.

His efforts to bring jobs back to the USA is another great idea in theory. But, in practice, how many people in this country are actually serious about wanting to work ? I am in a position to hear from many people each day about jobs. The fact is, many companies want to hire people already, and they find that applicants are not serious, or there are no applicants at all. So, we open the job market to 3-4 million new jobs. Why would people leave their homes and work for a living when they can fudge the truth, and get all sorts of state benefits for staying home so they can watch Judge Judy on TV ?

The answer lies in re-education and legal pressure. Make the criteria for obtaining benefits MUCH higher than they are now. And when a person only works long enough to qualify, then deliberately does something to get laid off so they can get the handouts, that loophole must be fixed.

Doctors and pharmaceutical companies need to explain the excessive 'referral' system, perks given to doctors and insurance systems. They need to be able to explain why a person with a tumor has to wait 4 days to get the appropriate scans, and then wait another 60 days before they can get a reading from their doctor as to what the scans revealed. This accountability is much more important that having a national healthcare database. If doctors are being required to do all the new paperwork, let them give an account fo themselves, not fill DC's computers with worthless information.

The abuses have come because we are no longer a Christian nation with Christian ideals. We have moved away from the faith of our fathers, and are suffering the consequences.

[ 03-26-2017, 07:59 PM: Message edited by: fal3 ]

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airforce
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The Tea Party helped elect Trump, and now Trump is declaring war on the Tea Party.

 -

They're even going so far as to claim the Freedom Caucus is aligned with the Democrats:

 -

The fallout from the healthcare clusterflunk is still happening, and no one knows how all this is going to play out. But it's pretty clear the GOP is going to try to marginalize the conservative and libertarian wings of the party.

The focus is shifting to tax "reform"now, and the administration is already signalling they want to work with the Democrats on this.

You can't say I didn't warn you.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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ObamaCare repeal is back on the agenda. Maybe trump and Ryan finally blinked.

quote:
House Republican leaders and the White House, under extreme pressure from conservative activists, have restarted negotiations on legislation to repeal the Affordable Care Act, with House leaders declaring that Democrats were celebrating the law’s survival prematurely.

Just days after President Trump said he was moving on to other issues, senior White House officials are now saying they have hope that they can still score the kind of big legislative victory that has so far eluded Mr. Trump. Vice President Mike Pence was dispatched to Capitol Hill on Tuesday for lunchtime talks.

“We’re not going to retrench into our corners or put up dividing lines,” House Speaker Paul D. Ryan said after a meeting of House Republicans that was dominated by a discussion of how to restart the health negotiations. “There’s too much at stake to get bogged down in all of that.”

The House Republican whip, Steve Scalise of Louisiana, said of Democrats, “Their celebration is premature. We are closer to repealing Obamacare than we ever have been before.”

It is not clear what political dynamics might have changed since Friday, when a coalition of hard-line conservatives and more moderate Republicans torpedoed legislation to repeal President Barack Obama’s signature domestic achievement. The replacement bill would still leave 24 million more Americans without insurance after a decade, a major worry for moderate Republicans. It would also leave in place regulations on the health insurance industry that conservatives find anathema.

Mr. Ryan declined to say what might be in the next version of the Republicans’ repeal bill, nor would he sketch any schedule for action. But he said Congress needed to act because insurers were developing the premiums and benefit packages for health plans they would offer in 2018, with review by federal and state officials beginning soon.

The new talks, which have been going on quietly this week, involve Stephen K. Bannon, the president’s chief strategist, and members of the two Republican factions that helped sink the bill last week, the hard-right (hey, it's a New York Times story, what did you expect?) Freedom Caucus and the more centrist Tuesday Group....

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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The White House is planning another attempt to repeal ObamaCare next week.

The federal government may also shut down next week.

Wouldn't it be great if they did both? [Smile]

Onward and upward,
airforce

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ConSigCor
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They can't screw the health system up much worse than it is now.

--------------------
"The time for war has not yet come, but it will come and that soon, and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Gen. T.J. Jackson, March 1861

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airforce
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The House Freedom Caucus will not support the ObamaCare replacement Act with the Macarthur Amendment. So much for just repealing the damn thing.

quote:
The hardline conservative House Freedom Caucus, which helped to sink Republicans' earlier attempt to revamp Obamacare last month, endorsed an amended plan Wednesday to replace the Affordable Care Act.

But it remains to be seen if moderate Republicans possibly wary of the new plan will get behind it and provide enough votes for passage in the House. The GOP has worked to balance the concerns of both groups in its caucus as it tries to follow through on a key campaign pledge by candidate Donald Trump.

In a statement, the Freedom Caucus said its members would support the plan if it includes the MacArthur amendment, which would allow states to waive some key Obamacare provisions. The compromise was negotiated between moderate GOP Rep. Tom MacArthur of New Jersey and Freedom Caucus leader Rep. Mark Meadows of North Carolina.

"The MacArthur amendment will grant states the ability to repeal cost driving aspects of Obamacare left in place under the original AHCA. While the revised version still does not fully repeal Obamacare, we are prepared to support it to keep our promise to the American people to lower healthcare costs," the Freedom Caucus said in a statement.

It is not clear how close the Freedom Caucus support will get the proposal to passage in the House. The group's backing puts pressure on moderate GOP members of Congress who may hesitate to back the plan.

The amendment lets states, in certain conditions, opt out of provisions to not charge customers more for pre-existing conditions and provide so-called essential health benefits.

Those pieces of the plan may irk some moderates already concerned about the estimates of health-care coverage losses under the original proposal to replace Obamacare.

Regardless of what happens in the House, efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare may face a tougher test in the Senate, where only three Republican defections can block the plan.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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So far, there are 13 "No" votes on the new bill. The Senate is looking pretty shaky too.

Onward and upward,
airforce

[ 04-27-2017, 11:56 AM: Message edited by: airforce ]

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airforce
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They won't be voting on it this week. They need 218 votes to pass it, and the votes aren't there. They'll try again next week, maybe.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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Will the GOP ever repeal ObamaCare? It's looking like the answer is NO.

quote:
The White House and congressional Republicans are in serious danger of not having enough votes to pass their health care bill.
Several Republicans have come out Monday against the current measure to repeal and replace Obamacare, bringing CNN's whip count to 21 Republicans -- mostly moderates -- opposed to the bill with at least 17 lawmakers still undecided.

There is no vote scheduled and it's unclear if there will be one before the House leaves for a week-long break Friday. There is a lot of talk and significant pressure from the Trump administration to act -- Vice President Mike Pence, who has been working with congressional leaders from the start on the health care effort, headed to Capitol Hill as well to lobby lawmakers....

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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The House is voting on the ObamaCare replacement bill now. I suspect it will pass, barely, with a flurry of GOP NO votes after it gets enough to pass. The RINOs want to go back to their voters and say they did vote against it.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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It was 217-213, with 20 RINOs voting NO. It's unlikely to pass the Senate in its present form.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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The 20 Republicans who voted against the GOP health care bill:

The list

Andy Biggs (AZ-5)
Mike Coffman (CO-6)
Barbara Comstock (VA-10)
Ryan Costello (PA-6)
Charlie Dent (PA-15)
Dan Donovan (NY-11)
Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-8)
Jaime Herrera Beutler (WA-3)
Will Hurd (TX-23)
Walter Jones (NC-3)
David Joyce (OH-14)
John Katko (NY-24)
Leonard Lance (NJ-7)
Frank LoBiondo (NJ-2)
Thomas Massie (KY-4)
Patrick Meehan (PA-7)
Dave Reichert (WA-8)
Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (FL-27)
Christopher Smith (NJ-4)
Michael Turner (OH-10)

Thomas Massie voted NO, but for reasons I completely agree with.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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Didn't sign up for the first BoBo Care and wont sign up for this BoBo-da-trump care either.

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"To achieve One World Government it is necessary to remove from the minds of men their individualism, their loyalty to family traditions and national identification."
~ Brock Chisholm, when director of UN World Health Organization

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airforce
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ObamaCare? TrumpCare? Get rid of it all. A new article by Chris Rossini.

quote:
Ever since the US government began to sink its claws into the medical industry a good 50 or so years ago, attempts at reducing costs have failed again and again. This is par for the course whenever government invades an industry.

Trying to reform this Frankenstein with either Obamacare, or Trumpcare, will solve nothing.

The problem is structural. Tinkering with this or that will just waste more time.

In order for real change to happen, a fundamental change has to occur in the thinking about what health care actually is. It's not what Americans have been conditioned to believe.

Peter Klein has put it into plain language in the following short video. I've also transcribed key sections below:

quote:
From a fundamental economics point of view, what is healthcare exactly? One of the things that's particularly frustrating for me as an economist is this notion that "healthcare" is some kind of a unique good or service, that everybody needs, everybody wants, but cannot be provided by the market the way the market provides shoes, or tomatoes, or automobiles, or any other good.

But what is healthcare?

Nobody consumes "healthcare". No one has a right to "healthcare," because healthcare is not a homogeneous thing.

There's no such thing as one unit of healthcare.

Rather what we mean by healthcare is a discreet set of specific commodities, goods and services, that you can buy in combinations, or different quality levels.

So open heart surgery is a service you can purchase on the market that contributes to your health. But so is taking an aspirin.

In other words, there's no such thing as "healthcare." There's a heterogenous bundle of goods and services that different individuals will want to consume at different levels.

Now when we think about it this way, it becomes far from obvious that these particular kinds of goods and services cannot be supplied on the market just like other goods and services.

If we would just allow the free market to work, if we could eliminate the third party payer system, the government subsidies on the expenditure side that drive prices up, there's no reason why a truly free market in healthcare goods and services couldn't be just as effective in the U.S. as the market for computers, software, automobiles, or the market for anything else.

It should be noted that it's not just the government that opposes the free market. Yes, politicians love wielding power and like forcing people to do things against their will.

But the cornucopia of crony businesses in the medical industry would oppose the free market as well. They have a sweet deal using government power to their advantage. The last thing they would want is to compete in a free market without government giving anyone an advantage.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=8lOC2itCc6g

So this is not a government vs. business issue.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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To lower health care costs, try freedom. A new essay from the Mises Institute.

quote:
As Congress debates the American Health Care Act, its members should remember the benefits in cost and quality generated by the free market. What Americans need is not another complicated insurance scheme, but a return to health care that patients pay for themselves.

For the past several decades, government intervention has pushed Americans to pay for more of their medical expenses with insurance. The result is that medical costs rose 118 percent from 1992 to 2012.

Costs rise under an insurance system because patients have no incentive to price-shop. As Nobel laureate Vernon Smith explains, in our current system, party A (the service provider) tells party B (the customer) what they should buy. Party C (either the government or an insurance company) then pays for it.

This deprives patients of the incentive to price-compare, because they’re not directly paying for the services that party A recommends. But when consumers are encouraged to factor in cost, prices fall.

In fact, this is exactly what has happened in areas of healthcare not dominated by insurance.


LASIK is an elective procedure that’s not covered by insurance; and over the past two decades, quality has risen as prices have fallen. In 1997, a precursor to LASIK surgery that involved the surgeon wielding a knife cost $8,000. In 2012, a safer laser-guided surgery cost only about $3,800. Prices halved in 15 years even as quality rose.

Cosmetic surgery is similarly not often covered by insurance. From 1992 to 2012, cosmetic surgery costs rose only 30 percent. Adjusted for inflation, costs actually fell.

Even traditional surgery is less expensive when patients bypass insurance. In the Wall Street Journal, Jeffrey Singer tells the story of a patient who decreased his out-of-pocket surgical costs from $20,000 to $3,000 by negotiating price with the hospital on his own instead of relying on insurance.

Putting patients in charge of their own healthcare encourages them to be price-conscious. When this happens, service providers have an incentive to compete on price, and competition produces downward price pressure.

In a free market, one in which the law didn’t require that insurance cover everything from pregnancy to mental health, health insurance would primarily cover catastrophes. Elective procedures would be paid for by the patient, either in cash or with financing.

A free market in health care could also lower costs by incentivizing surgeries that reduce health care costs long term.

Bariatric surgery is a classic example: while weight loss surgery costs $14,000 to $23,000 on average, it often pays for itself in lower medical costs for patients. This is because obesity can cause expensive health conditions such as sleep apnea, high cholesterol, and heart conditions; the average cost of obesity is about $15,000 per year. Bariatric surgery, which helps 80 percent of patients to lose most of their unwanted weight and keep it off, can substantially reduce these problems. For instance, the duodenal switch helps 95 percent of patients to resolve their Type II diabetes.

To be clear, bariatric surgery is not right for everyone, and solutions like the Lap Band can cause substantial complications. However, for those for whom it is a good fit, surgery can reduce lifetime health care costs dramatically.

Unfortunately, our current highly regulated healthcare market drives up costs and prevents patients from receiving surgery. In a survey of primary care providers, 53 percent of respondents reported that their patients could not afford weight loss surgery. That’s one reason why, even though one-third of Americans are obese, less than 200,000 receive weight loss surgery each year.

Right now, 80 percent of patients rely on private insurance to pay for bariatric surgery, which inflates costs. Additionally, many insurance providers refuse to cover surgery, in part because the patient could have an expensive surgery under X insurer, and then switch to Y insurer afterward; Y would then reap the financial rewards of a less expensive customer. Critics may call this a market failure, but this situation would be uncommon in a true free market where people paid for their own costs and reaped the benefits themselves.

If we want to incentivize cost-saving surgeries, we should roll back the laws that give insurance an outsize influence in healthcare.

The United States health care system is one of the most regulated sectors of the economy, and was so even before Obamacare. This has, predictably, driven up costs. Instead of another complicated insurance scheme, let’s give freedom a try.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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Well, so much for that campaign promise. Republicans gave up trying to repeal Obamacare, and now they're likely not to pass anything at all. Mithtch McConnell now says he doesn't know how he'll get 50 GOP votes in the Senate on a new health care bill.

quote:
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Wednesday said the path forward for the legislation to repeal and replace Obamacare remains unclear, adding that he is unsure at the moment how such a measure will secure the requisite 50 votes from the GOP’s 52 senators.

"I don't know how we get to 50 (votes) at the moment. But that's the goal,” McConnell (R-Ky.) told Reuters in an interview. He said passing a repeal-and-replace measure, a campaign promise of GOP lawmakers for more than seven years and a key plank of President Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign, remains a top priority.

Work on repeal-and-replace legislation had already begun in the Senate well before the House managed to pass its own bill, dubbed the American Health Care Act. Multiple GOP senators have said that they do not intend to take up the House-passed measure but will instead work on approving their own bill.

McConnell told Reuters that he does not intend to reach out to any Democrats in order to pass the Senate’s version of the healthcare bill because the gulf between the two parties on the issue is too great to overcome....

Don't blame me. I voted for Gary Johnson.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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The senate version of the American Health care Act is reportedly almost finished, but the few Republican senators in charge of drafting it sure aren't talking about it. Not even their fellow Republican senators have seen it.

That actually says a lot about the bill. If they were enthusiastic about it, you can be sure they would be talking about it. The general public? Screw them.

The GOP plans to fast track the bill through the legislative process in secret and, very possible, without any hearings at all. Which is pretty much how ObamaCare passed in the first place.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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Mitch McConnell may hold a vote on TrumpCare next week. It's not even drafted yet. If this isn't a recipe for disaster, I don't know what one is.

Why would he do this? Here are five theories:

quote:
Keeping a Promise: The first is that Republicans simply feel they need to make good a promise to repeal Obamacare. Any legislation that looks roughly like the House bill would not exactly do that; the AHCA retains Obamacare's individual insurance market structure, keeping the health law's insurance regulations in place at the federal level while altering its insurance tax credit. But it would allow Republicans to claim that they have done so. This is one of the arguments that Speaker of the House Paul Ryan made on the day the House passed its bill. "This bill delivers on the promises that we have made to the American people," he said. "A lot of us have been waiting seven years to cast this vote."

It's A Marginal Improvement: A second reason why McConnell might be proceeding is that, although Republicans don't think a great bill, they believe it is at least somewhat better than Obamacare. This is basically the argument that Rep. Justin Amash (R-Michigan) made after casting a vote in favor of the AHCA despite having been one of the more outspoken GOP critics of the plan. "The proper analysis is not whether it makes the law good but rather whether it makes the law better," Amash wrote. "In this case, I felt comfortable advancing the bill to the Senate as a marginal improvement to the ACA."

The Health Care Hot Potato: Amash and most of the other members of the House Freedom Caucus voted for the AHCA even after spending weeks strongly criticizing the bill. Part of the reason why was the pressure applied by President Trump, who personally lobbied individual holdouts, as well as the Freedom Caucus as a group. Trump didn't just urge them to vote, however. He also called them out on his Twitter feed—and even hinted that he might back primary challengers: "The Freedom Caucus will hurt the entire Republican agenda if they don't get on the team, & fast. We must fight them, & Dems, in 2018!" As Reason's Matt Welch wrote, Trump appears "confident that he can similarly bully 50 of the Senate's 52 Republicans into line." So even though as few as three GOP senators could hold up the vote, or slow down the process, no one wants to be the target of an early morning Trump Twitter rant accusing them of being the holdout on Obamacare repeal.

It's a Setup For Tax Reform: Congressional Republicans haven't spent much time defending the AHCA framework on the health policy merits. But they have frequently described the bill as a helpful setup for tax reform, the next major item on their domestic policy agenda. There are only 52 Republicans in the Senate, so in order to pass a tax reform that permanently lowers tax rates with a simple majority, Republicans need to use the reconciliation process, which does not allow for deficit increases beyond the 10 year budget window. The GOP health care bill eliminates Obamacare's taxes and offsets them with Medicaid cuts, leading to a lower revenue baseline, which in turn makes it easier to design a tax code that slashes rates. That is why Republicans put Obamacare first on their agenda and have pushed to move it quickly.

This is not speculative. Republicans have been rather open about viewing the AHCA as a necessary prologue to permanent tax reform built around cuts to tax rates: "We want a very big tax cut, but cannot do that until we keep our promise to repeal and replace the disaster known as Obamacare," President Trump said earlier this year. At the Rose Garden ceremony celebrating the passage of the AHCA, Trump said the health care bill helps pave the way for a tax cut, and Rep. Kevin Brady, who chairs the tax-writing Ways and Means Committee, also declared the bill a victory for a tax policy, saying, "Make no mistake, today we have taken a giant step toward delivering bold tax reform."

"Show Them a Body": Finally, it's possible that McConnell wants the bill to fail—but needs to hold a vote first. This is the theory advanced by a Republican health care lobbyist to Vox reporter Dylan Scott earlier this month. "They have to be able to show the electorate a body, to say that they tried and failed," the lobbyist said. McConnell is a vote counter and strategist who has never been too focused on the particulars of the GOP's policy agenda, but he has always been a shrewd political operator. So he may have taken a look at the AHCA's poll numbers, and the dissent and disunity amongst Senate Republicans, and decided that the best course would be to hold a vote, let it fail, and move on.

Onward and upward,
airforce

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airforce
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TrumpCare is now expected to be revealed on Thursday. Sen. Rand Paul is already skeptical:

quote:


The House bill has 90 percent of the subsidies of Obamacare….If this gets any more subsidies in it, it may well be equal to what we have in Obamacare. So it really wouldn't be repeal. […]

I think they've forgotten all the rallies where they said they were going to repeal it. I mean, we had thousands of people standing up and cheering us on saying they were going to repeal it. And now they've gotten kind of weak-kneed and I think they want to keep it. But they're getting hit from both sides. Conservatives who are in the know are going to know that this isn't repeal. And no Democrat likes it because they think it's going to go too far. So I think you're going to wind up with what you had in the House bill—about 20 percent of the public's going to think it's a good idea.

So is Sen. Mike Lee:

quote:
Even though I've been a member of this working group among Senate Republicans assigned to help narrow some of the focus of this, I haven't seen the bill....And it has become increasingly apparent in the last few days that even though we thought we were going to be in charge of writing a bill within this working group, it's not being written by us, it's apparently being written by a small handful of staffers for members of the Republican leadership in the Senate....We should have been able to see it weeks ago if we were going to voting on it next week.
Onward and upward,
airforce

Posts: 17061 | From: Tulsa | Registered: Jan 2002  | Report this post to a Moderator
airforce
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The 142-page TrumpCare bill is out. It wasn't worth the wait. it looks like a cross between the House bill, and ObamaCare itself.

How does it solve the problem of insurers leaving the exchanges? Simple - it authorizes subsidies to the insurers, at least through 2019. How much of a betrayal is this? A couple years ago Republicans sued the Obama administration for paying out insurers. Now the Republican bill expressly authorizes these subsidies.

What about individual subsides for health insurance? ObamaCare authorized subsidies for those with incomes up to 400% of the poverty line - that's %98,000 for a family of four. The senate bill cute that tremendously, to 350% of the poverty line. Whoopie.

This bill is everything I feared it would be. Need proof the Republicans are out of ideas? Here it is.

Onward and upward,
airforce

Posts: 17061 | From: Tulsa | Registered: Jan 2002  | Report this post to a Moderator
airforce
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As it stands right now, the bill is deservedly dead. Rand Paul, Mike Lee, Ron Johnson, and Ted Cruz all say they will vote against it.

Onward and upward,
airforce

Posts: 17061 | From: Tulsa | Registered: Jan 2002  | Report this post to a Moderator
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